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 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
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 Cars are parked at dusk at Motel Rapid on Sturgis Road, or a portion of the Interstate 90 business loop, in Rapid city
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 Julie Trask, a large-animal veterinarian, is completely mobile. Weather she is vaccinating cattle dogs or semen testing bulls, her supplies are packed into her pickup so she can travel as far as her clients need her to go. Trask drives through cattle pasture at on her uncle's property in Elm Springs.
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 Decor in Julie's mudroom
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 The historic Fairmont Creamery building at Main and 2nd streets was one of the first spaces east of Fifth to have been renovated for house multiple new businesses.
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 The historic Fairmont Creamery building at Main and 2nd streets was one of the first spaces east of Fifth to have been renovated for house multiple new businesses.
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 The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
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 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
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 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
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 The historic Aby's Feed and Seed has been a staple image on the downtown skyline. The space has been renovated and now houses several local businesses.
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 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
 The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
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 A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
 Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
 A young visitor to the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, looks out over the encampment from hay bales stacked to protect residents and visitors from unwanted harassment from unsupportive onlookers. The Spirit Camp was started in March 2014 and is set on a tract of Rosebud Sioux Tribe land outside of the main land of the reservation in south-central South Dakota. A corner of the land is adjacent to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown. Bicycles are available for rent in the Main Street Square parking garage.
 Horses graze in a field on the Standing Rock 
Sioux Tribe reservation. The reservation encompasses 
over 800,000 acres of land.
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 Bryan Silvernail, an infrastructure tech operating the elevator lift, makes a stop in the Yates Shaft at the 3,800-level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, giving elevator riders a glimpse into what the gold mine once looked like.
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 A view of a handprinted mural in the community of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.
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 Chevy, 2009
A vintage Chevrolet is seen in Alcester, South Dakota.
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 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
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 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
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 Sue watches the sun set from the end of the dock next to her houseboat on the San Joaquin delta. Sue and her husband Robert have lived on a houseboat together on the Delta for almost two years. Mounting medical bills and health complications has Sue waiting to see if Robert's health gets well enough so that he can start working again. Robert suffered a heart attack earlier this year and is living with Coronary Heart Disease.
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 A horse stands on a bluff at the edge of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation along Highway 44 in South Dakota.
 A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
 A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 The rising moon is seen through tipi poles at the Seven Councils Camp. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 A flag waves over the city of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at Overlook Park on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 A view of the Wyodak power plant in Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at dusk on Monday evening, Jan. 23, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
 A view of Antelope Valley Road in Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have meant hundreds of layoffs and a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A pronghorn is seen at the top of the Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015.  (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Dry Fork Station power plant, operated by the Basin Electric Coperative, is seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Train cars move through a loading area at Peabody Energy's Rawhide Mine, as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. Peabody Energy filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The setting sun washes light over clouds above Wyoming Highway 59 near the Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The sun sets over Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of a residential neighborhood as seen from Boxelder Road in Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have meant hundreds of layoffs and a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A roadside art stand near the site of the Wounded Knee Massacre is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. During the summer tourism months, local artists are often seen at these types of road side stands. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
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 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
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 Cars are parked at dusk at Motel Rapid on Sturgis Road, or a portion of the Interstate 90 business loop, in Rapid city
Cars are parked at dusk at Motel Rapid on Sturgis Road, or a portion of the Interstate 90 business loop, in Rapid city
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 Julie Trask, a large-animal veterinarian, is completely mobile. Weather she is vaccinating cattle dogs or semen testing bulls, her supplies are packed into her pickup so she can travel as far as her clients need her to go. Trask drives through cattle pasture at on her uncle's property in Elm Springs.
Julie Trask, a large-animal veterinarian, is completely mobile. Weather she is vaccinating cattle dogs or semen testing bulls, her supplies are packed into her pickup so she can travel as far as her clients need her to go. Trask drives through cattle pasture at on her uncle's property in Elm Springs.
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 Decor in Julie's mudroom
Decor in Julie's mudroom
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WYG - SD
WYG - SDA four-bedroom home in Keystone, South Dakota is on the market for $795,000. The home was built within a portion of a 1920s wood mill. The nearly 17-acre property also includes several outbuildings. The home features a master bedroom, two guest rooms and one full bathroom which is only accessible from outside the home. Several outbuildings are still standing on the historic property. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 The historic Fairmont Creamery building at Main and 2nd streets was one of the first spaces east of Fifth to have been renovated for house multiple new businesses.
The historic Fairmont Creamery building at Main and 2nd streets was one of the first spaces east of Fifth to have been renovated for house multiple new businesses.
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 The historic Fairmont Creamery building at Main and 2nd streets was one of the first spaces east of Fifth to have been renovated for house multiple new businesses.
The historic Fairmont Creamery building at Main and 2nd streets was one of the first spaces east of Fifth to have been renovated for house multiple new businesses.
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 The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
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 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
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 sugar bowl
sugar bowl
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 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
08262007_mexico001.JPG
 The historic Aby's Feed and Seed has been a staple image on the downtown skyline. The space has been renovated and now houses several local businesses.
The historic Aby's Feed and Seed has been a staple image on the downtown skyline. The space has been renovated and now houses several local businesses.
Stockphotos_Archive026.JPG
 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
BHFCU047.JPG
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
 The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
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 A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
 Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
 A young visitor to the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, looks out over the encampment from hay bales stacked to protect residents and visitors from unwanted harassment from unsupportive onlookers. The Spirit Camp was started in March 2014 and is set on a tract of Rosebud Sioux Tribe land outside of the main land of the reservation in south-central South Dakota. A corner of the land is adjacent to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
A young visitor to the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, looks out over the encampment from hay bales stacked to protect residents and visitors from unwanted harassment from unsupportive onlookers. The Spirit Camp was started in March 2014 and is set on a tract of Rosebud Sioux Tribe land outside of the main land of the reservation in south-central South Dakota. A corner of the land is adjacent to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown. Bicycles are available for rent in the Main Street Square parking garage.
The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown. Bicycles are available for rent in the Main Street Square parking garage.
 Horses graze in a field on the Standing Rock 
Sioux Tribe reservation. The reservation encompasses 
over 800,000 acres of land.
Horses graze in a field on the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation. The reservation encompasses over 800,000 acres of land.
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 Bryan Silvernail, an infrastructure tech operating the elevator lift, makes a stop in the Yates Shaft at the 3,800-level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, giving elevator riders a glimpse into what the gold mine once looked like.
Bryan Silvernail, an infrastructure tech operating the elevator lift, makes a stop in the Yates Shaft at the 3,800-level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, giving elevator riders a glimpse into what the gold mine once looked like.
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 A view of a handprinted mural in the community of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.
A view of a handprinted mural in the community of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.
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A vintage Chevrolet is seen in Alcester, South Dakota.
Chevy, 2009 A vintage Chevrolet is seen in Alcester, South Dakota.
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 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
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 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
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 Sue watches the sun set from the end of the dock next to her houseboat on the San Joaquin delta. Sue and her husband Robert have lived on a houseboat together on the Delta for almost two years. Mounting medical bills and health complications has Sue waiting to see if Robert's health gets well enough so that he can start working again. Robert suffered a heart attack earlier this year and is living with Coronary Heart Disease.
Sue watches the sun set from the end of the dock next to her houseboat on the San Joaquin delta. Sue and her husband Robert have lived on a houseboat together on the Delta for almost two years. Mounting medical bills and health complications has Sue waiting to see if Robert's health gets well enough so that he can start working again. Robert suffered a heart attack earlier this year and is living with Coronary Heart Disease.
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 A horse stands on a bluff at the edge of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation along Highway 44 in South Dakota.
A horse stands on a bluff at the edge of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation along Highway 44 in South Dakota.
 A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
 A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 The rising moon is seen through tipi poles at the Seven Councils Camp. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
The rising moon is seen through tipi poles at the Seven Councils Camp. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 A flag waves over the city of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at Overlook Park on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
A flag waves over the city of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at Overlook Park on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 A view of the Wyodak power plant in Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at dusk on Monday evening, Jan. 23, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
A view of the Wyodak power plant in Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at dusk on Monday evening, Jan. 23, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
 A view of Antelope Valley Road in Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have meant hundreds of layoffs and a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Antelope Valley Road in Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have meant hundreds of layoffs and a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A pronghorn is seen at the top of the Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015.  (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A pronghorn is seen at the top of the Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Dry Fork Station power plant, operated by the Basin Electric Coperative, is seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Dry Fork Station power plant, operated by the Basin Electric Coperative, is seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Train cars move through a loading area at Peabody Energy's Rawhide Mine, as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. Peabody Energy filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Train cars move through a loading area at Peabody Energy's Rawhide Mine, as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. Peabody Energy filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The setting sun washes light over clouds above Wyoming Highway 59 near the Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The setting sun washes light over clouds above Wyoming Highway 59 near the Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The sun sets over Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The sun sets over Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of a residential neighborhood as seen from Boxelder Road in Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have meant hundreds of layoffs and a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of a residential neighborhood as seen from Boxelder Road in Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have meant hundreds of layoffs and a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A roadside art stand near the site of the Wounded Knee Massacre is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. During the summer tourism months, local artists are often seen at these types of road side stands. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A roadside art stand near the site of the Wounded Knee Massacre is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. During the summer tourism months, local artists are often seen at these types of road side stands. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
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USA-COAL/CLEANUP/A cattle pasture is seen west of Gillette, Wyoming, U.S. May 31, 2016. Like much of the region, cattle ranching is a source of income for some of the area residents. REUTERS/Kristina Barker
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