111317-Highways003.JPG
111417-Highways004.JPG
WomensRestroom003.JPG
WomensRestroom002.JPG
WomensRestroom001.JPG
 A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
 In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, a lone tree stands south of the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, in a field teeming with pheasants and other birds. Area residents, livestock, and wildlife all depend on clean water that some area residents and tribal members believe could be ruined by the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
 The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota.
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Flag bearer Phil Randall, of Custer, S.D., rides through a pasture at the 49th annual Custer State Park Buffalo Roundup on Friday, Sept. 26, 2014, in the southern Black Hills near Custer, S.D. After the roundup, some of the buffalo were vaccinated, branded, checked for pregnancies and others were sorted for an auction that will be held Nov. 15, 2014. (AP/Kristina Barker)
 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Prairie001.JPG
MensRestroom003.JPG
MensRestroom002.JPG
BlackHills003.JPG
BlackHills002.JPG
BlackHills001.JPG
 The last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Badlands002.JPG
Badlands001.JPG
 A cattle skulls hangs above the entrance to a grazing pasture along S.D. Highway 79.
 Smoke from a wildfire in the Black Hills dusts the horizon in ashy violets as the sun sets on the prairie below Bear Butte outside of Sturgis. The mountain is a sacred place for many Native Americans.
 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
 Livestock feed in the Rosebud Sioux Tribe's corrals in Rosebud, South Dakota. Tribal members long fought to not have the Keystone XL Pipeline cross through their fertile farmland.
 Bryan Silvernail, an infrastructure tech operating the elevator lift, makes a stop in the Yates Shaft at the 3,800-level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, giving elevator riders a glimpse into what the gold mine once looked like.
 A young visitor to the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, looks out over the encampment from hay bales stacked to protect residents and visitors from unwanted harassment from unsupportive onlookers. The Spirit Camp was started in March 2014 and is set on a tract of Rosebud Sioux Tribe land outside of the main land of the reservation in south-central South Dakota. A corner of the land is adjacent to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
 Light from the setting sun washes over the sky above Rapid City after an August thunderstorm.
 Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
101417-Fall004.JPG
092616-AlkaliRoad.JPG
072717-WildArt001.JPG
016.JPG
012.JPG
011.JPG
001.JPG
111317-Highways002.JPG
111417-Highways001.JPG
111417-Highways002.JPG
111417-Highways003.JPG
111417-Highways005.JPG
111417-Highways006.JPG
111317-Highways003.JPG
111417-Highways004.JPG
WomensRestroom003.JPG
WomensRestroom002.JPG
WomensRestroom001.JPG
 A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
 In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, a lone tree stands south of the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, in a field teeming with pheasants and other birds. Area residents, livestock, and wildlife all depend on clean water that some area residents and tribal members believe could be ruined by the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, a lone tree stands south of the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, in a field teeming with pheasants and other birds. Area residents, livestock, and wildlife all depend on clean water that some area residents and tribal members believe could be ruined by the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
 The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota.
The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota.
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Flag bearer Phil Randall, of Custer, S.D., rides through a pasture at the 49th annual Custer State Park Buffalo Roundup on Friday, Sept. 26, 2014, in the southern Black Hills near Custer, S.D. After the roundup, some of the buffalo were vaccinated, branded, checked for pregnancies and others were sorted for an auction that will be held Nov. 15, 2014. (AP/Kristina Barker)
Flag bearer Phil Randall, of Custer, S.D., rides through a pasture at the 49th annual Custer State Park Buffalo Roundup on Friday, Sept. 26, 2014, in the southern Black Hills near Custer, S.D. After the roundup, some of the buffalo were vaccinated, branded, checked for pregnancies and others were sorted for an auction that will be held Nov. 15, 2014. (AP/Kristina Barker)
 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Prairie001.JPG
MensRestroom003.JPG
MensRestroom002.JPG
BlackHills003.JPG
BlackHills002.JPG
BlackHills001.JPG
 The last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.
The last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Badlands002.JPG
Badlands001.JPG
 A cattle skulls hangs above the entrance to a grazing pasture along S.D. Highway 79.
A cattle skulls hangs above the entrance to a grazing pasture along S.D. Highway 79.
 Smoke from a wildfire in the Black Hills dusts the horizon in ashy violets as the sun sets on the prairie below Bear Butte outside of Sturgis. The mountain is a sacred place for many Native Americans.
Smoke from a wildfire in the Black Hills dusts the horizon in ashy violets as the sun sets on the prairie below Bear Butte outside of Sturgis. The mountain is a sacred place for many Native Americans.
 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
 Livestock feed in the Rosebud Sioux Tribe's corrals in Rosebud, South Dakota. Tribal members long fought to not have the Keystone XL Pipeline cross through their fertile farmland.
Livestock feed in the Rosebud Sioux Tribe's corrals in Rosebud, South Dakota. Tribal members long fought to not have the Keystone XL Pipeline cross through their fertile farmland.
 Bryan Silvernail, an infrastructure tech operating the elevator lift, makes a stop in the Yates Shaft at the 3,800-level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, giving elevator riders a glimpse into what the gold mine once looked like.
Bryan Silvernail, an infrastructure tech operating the elevator lift, makes a stop in the Yates Shaft at the 3,800-level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota, giving elevator riders a glimpse into what the gold mine once looked like.
 A young visitor to the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, looks out over the encampment from hay bales stacked to protect residents and visitors from unwanted harassment from unsupportive onlookers. The Spirit Camp was started in March 2014 and is set on a tract of Rosebud Sioux Tribe land outside of the main land of the reservation in south-central South Dakota. A corner of the land is adjacent to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
A young visitor to the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, looks out over the encampment from hay bales stacked to protect residents and visitors from unwanted harassment from unsupportive onlookers. The Spirit Camp was started in March 2014 and is set on a tract of Rosebud Sioux Tribe land outside of the main land of the reservation in south-central South Dakota. A corner of the land is adjacent to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
 Light from the setting sun washes over the sky above Rapid City after an August thunderstorm.
Light from the setting sun washes over the sky above Rapid City after an August thunderstorm.
 Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
101417-Fall004.JPG
092616-AlkaliRoad.JPG
072717-WildArt001.JPG
016.JPG
012.JPG
011.JPG
001.JPG
111317-Highways002.JPG
111417-Highways001.JPG
111417-Highways002.JPG
111417-Highways003.JPG
111417-Highways005.JPG
111417-Highways006.JPG
info
prev / next