Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
 A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Julie Trask semen tests bulls at client Marvin Willaims' ranch near Owanka. The process begins with Trask and Williams moving bulls into a holding chute where Trask then inserts an electric probe into the bull's rear. When the electric probe is turned on, the electric pulses cause the bull to become erect, making it possible for Trask to get a semen sample. The sample, along with measurements of the bull's scrotum and observations about their hooves tells Trask the strength and virility of each bull. That information will then be used by Williams for his own cattle operation's breeding purses or when he goes to sell the bulls.
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
USA-STURGIS/BIKERALLY
USA-STURGIS/BIKERALLY
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 A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation.
USA-STURGIS/BIKERALLY
USA-STURGIS/BIKERALLY
 Julie Trask, a large-animal veterinarian, is completely mobile. Weather she is vaccinating cattle dogs or semen testing bulls, her supplies are packed into her pickup so she can travel as far as her clients need her to go. Trask drives through cattle pasture at on her uncle's property in Elm Springs.
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
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 A view of the Dry Fork Station power plant, operated by the Basin Electric Coperative, is seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A young visitor to the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, looks out over the encampment from hay bales stacked to protect residents and visitors from unwanted harassment from unsupportive onlookers. The Spirit Camp was started in March 2014 and is set on a tract of Rosebud Sioux Tribe land outside of the main land of the reservation in south-central South Dakota. A corner of the land is adjacent to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
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 Light pollution from the surrounding oil fields fill the midnight sky above the Little Missouri State Park campground in North Dakota.
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USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
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 Livestock feed in the Rosebud Sioux Tribe's corrals in Rosebud, South Dakota. Tribal members long fought to not have the Keystone XL Pipeline cross through their fertile farmland.
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 Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
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 Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
 A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Julie Trask semen tests bulls at client Marvin Willaims' ranch near Owanka. The process begins with Trask and Williams moving bulls into a holding chute where Trask then inserts an electric probe into the bull's rear. When the electric probe is turned on, the electric pulses cause the bull to become erect, making it possible for Trask to get a semen sample. The sample, along with measurements of the bull's scrotum and observations about their hooves tells Trask the strength and virility of each bull. That information will then be used by Williams for his own cattle operation's breeding purses or when he goes to sell the bulls.
Julie Trask semen tests bulls at client Marvin Willaims' ranch near Owanka. The process begins with Trask and Williams moving bulls into a holding chute where Trask then inserts an electric probe into the bull's rear. When the electric probe is turned on, the electric pulses cause the bull to become erect, making it possible for Trask to get a semen sample. The sample, along with measurements of the bull's scrotum and observations about their hooves tells Trask the strength and virility of each bull. That information will then be used by Williams for his own cattle operation's breeding purses or when he goes to sell the bulls.
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
USA-STURGIS/BIKERALLY
USA-STURGIS/BIKERALLYThe sun sets on Devils Tower National Monument outside of Sundance, Wyoming.
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 A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation.
A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation.
USA-STURGIS/BIKERALLY
USA-STURGIS/BIKERALLYBikers stop for buffalo crossing a highway in Custer State Park during the 75th Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.
 Julie Trask, a large-animal veterinarian, is completely mobile. Weather she is vaccinating cattle dogs or semen testing bulls, her supplies are packed into her pickup so she can travel as far as her clients need her to go. Trask drives through cattle pasture at on her uncle's property in Elm Springs.
Julie Trask, a large-animal veterinarian, is completely mobile. Weather she is vaccinating cattle dogs or semen testing bulls, her supplies are packed into her pickup so she can travel as far as her clients need her to go. Trask drives through cattle pasture at on her uncle's property in Elm Springs.
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
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 A view of the Dry Fork Station power plant, operated by the Basin Electric Coperative, is seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Dry Fork Station power plant, operated by the Basin Electric Coperative, is seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A young visitor to the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, looks out over the encampment from hay bales stacked to protect residents and visitors from unwanted harassment from unsupportive onlookers. The Spirit Camp was started in March 2014 and is set on a tract of Rosebud Sioux Tribe land outside of the main land of the reservation in south-central South Dakota. A corner of the land is adjacent to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
A young visitor to the Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, or Spirit Camp, looks out over the encampment from hay bales stacked to protect residents and visitors from unwanted harassment from unsupportive onlookers. The Spirit Camp was started in March 2014 and is set on a tract of Rosebud Sioux Tribe land outside of the main land of the reservation in south-central South Dakota. A corner of the land is adjacent to the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.
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 Light pollution from the surrounding oil fields fill the midnight sky above the Little Missouri State Park campground in North Dakota.
Light pollution from the surrounding oil fields fill the midnight sky above the Little Missouri State Park campground in North Dakota.
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020410.BuffaloSale.jpgKristina Barker/Journal staff Buffalo were unloaded at the Central States Fairgrounds on Thursday afternoon, Feb. 4, 2010, in preparation for the coming weekend's two day buffalo show and sale.
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USA-COAL/CLEANUP/The sun sets over a stretch of the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Railway west of Gillette, Wyoming, U.S. May 31, 2016. The railroad sees coal traffic from area coal mines. An empty coal train is seen here leaving the city. REUTERS/Kristina Barker
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 Livestock feed in the Rosebud Sioux Tribe's corrals in Rosebud, South Dakota. Tribal members long fought to not have the Keystone XL Pipeline cross through their fertile farmland.
Livestock feed in the Rosebud Sioux Tribe's corrals in Rosebud, South Dakota. Tribal members long fought to not have the Keystone XL Pipeline cross through their fertile farmland.
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 Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
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