072717-WildArt002.JPG
4T7A8877.JPG
041317-LittleAmerica001.jpg
072117-Badlands001.JPG
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
072117-Badlands003.JPG
072717-WildArt001.JPG
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
0409.RedCloud002.JPG
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
DakotaHighway.jpg
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
 Flag bearer Phil Randall, of Custer, S.D., rides through a pasture at the 49th annual Custer State Park Buffalo Roundup in September 2014.
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
 Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
 Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 The sun sets over pasture near He Dog school on the Rosebud reservation in South Dakota.
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A fall leaf sits in one of the first snows of the winter season in Rapid City, South Dakota.
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The sun sets on the Conata Basin overlook in Badlands National Park.
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
Stockphotos_Archive011.JPG
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
062316-IdahoMontana020.JPG
 The last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.
072717-WildArt002.JPG
4T7A8877.JPG
041317-LittleAmerica001.jpg
072117-Badlands001.JPG
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
072117-Badlands003.JPG
072717-WildArt001.JPG
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
0409.RedCloud002.JPG
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
DakotaHighway.jpg
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
 Flag bearer Phil Randall, of Custer, S.D., rides through a pasture at the 49th annual Custer State Park Buffalo Roundup in September 2014.
Flag bearer Phil Randall, of Custer, S.D., rides through a pasture at the 49th annual Custer State Park Buffalo Roundup in September 2014.
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/A cattle pasture is seen west of Gillette, Wyoming, U.S. May 31, 2016. Like much of the region, cattle ranching is a source of income for some of the area residents. REUTERS/Kristina Barker
 Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
 Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 The sun sets over pasture near He Dog school on the Rosebud reservation in South Dakota.
The sun sets over pasture near He Dog school on the Rosebud reservation in South Dakota.
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A fall leaf sits in one of the first snows of the winter season in Rapid City, South Dakota.
A fall leaf sits in one of the first snows of the winter season in Rapid City, South Dakota.
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The sun sets on the Conata Basin overlook in Badlands National Park.
The sun sets on the Conata Basin overlook in Badlands National Park.
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/The sun sets over a stretch of the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Railway west of Gillette, Wyoming, U.S. May 31, 2016. The railroad sees coal traffic from area coal mines. An empty coal train is seen here leaving the city. REUTERS/Kristina Barker
Stockphotos_Archive011.JPG
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/
USA-COAL/CLEANUP/A cattle pasture is seen west of Gillette, Wyoming, U.S. May 31, 2016. Like much of the region, cattle ranching is a source of income for some of the area residents. REUTERS/Kristina Barker
062316-IdahoMontana020.JPG
 The last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.
The last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.
info
prev / next