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 Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
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 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Dan O'Brien is pictured near the Wild Idea Buffalo ranch. Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
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 WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
 WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
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 Mayor Louise Carter-King is seen here in her office at City Hall in Gillette, Wyoming, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2016. In 2015, Carter-King became the city's first female mayor. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
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 Red Cloud High School student Jacob Rosales is celebrated for his academic achievements that are providing him with post-high school educational opportunities. Rosales is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Brad McGlothlin, 38, is a dragline operator at the North Antelope Rochelle coal mine south of Gillette, Wyoming. McGlothlin weas laid off from his position as part of hundreds of layoffs effecting Peabody Energy employees, but he was hired back after three months. �All I want to do is go to work, be left alone, and pay my taxes. I don�t need a government ruling my life,� he explains about what he wants from those in power. �I voted for Donald Trump and I�m very optimistic.� Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, Paul Seamans, the Dakota Rural Action Board Chairperson, is seen in his home near Draper, S.D. Seamans says that he is hopeful the fight against the Keystone XL pipeline has been strengthened by Native and non-Native community members banding together to have their concerns heard. The allies in the fight against the pipeline both agree that water is a source of life and should be protected.
_T7A9734.JPG
 Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
040414-YFSfriday0089.JPG
032608-Train021.JPG
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Portraits_007.JPG
 Dan O'Brien is pictured near the Wild Idea Buffalo ranch. Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
Dan O'Brien is pictured near the Wild Idea Buffalo ranch. Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
011316-Rosebud036.JPG
 WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
 WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
SDBUFFALO129.JPG
 Mayor Louise Carter-King is seen here in her office at City Hall in Gillette, Wyoming, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2016. In 2015, Carter-King became the city's first female mayor. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Mayor Louise Carter-King is seen here in her office at City Hall in Gillette, Wyoming, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2016. In 2015, Carter-King became the city's first female mayor. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
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 Red Cloud High School student Jacob Rosales is celebrated for his academic achievements that are providing him with post-high school educational opportunities. Rosales is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Red Cloud High School student Jacob Rosales is celebrated for his academic achievements that are providing him with post-high school educational opportunities. Rosales is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Brad McGlothlin, 38, is a dragline operator at the North Antelope Rochelle coal mine south of Gillette, Wyoming. McGlothlin weas laid off from his position as part of hundreds of layoffs effecting Peabody Energy employees, but he was hired back after three months. �All I want to do is go to work, be left alone, and pay my taxes. I don�t need a government ruling my life,� he explains about what he wants from those in power. �I voted for Donald Trump and I�m very optimistic.� Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Brad McGlothlin, 38, is a dragline operator at the North Antelope Rochelle coal mine south of Gillette, Wyoming. McGlothlin weas laid off from his position as part of hundreds of layoffs effecting Peabody Energy employees, but he was hired back after three months. �All I want to do is go to work, be left alone, and pay my taxes. I don�t need a government ruling my life,� he explains about what he wants from those in power. �I voted for Donald Trump and I�m very optimistic.� Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, Paul Seamans, the Dakota Rural Action Board Chairperson, is seen in his home near Draper, S.D. Seamans says that he is hopeful the fight against the Keystone XL pipeline has been strengthened by Native and non-Native community members banding together to have their concerns heard. The allies in the fight against the pipeline both agree that water is a source of life and should be protected.
In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, Paul Seamans, the Dakota Rural Action Board Chairperson, is seen in his home near Draper, S.D. Seamans says that he is hopeful the fight against the Keystone XL pipeline has been strengthened by Native and non-Native community members banding together to have their concerns heard. The allies in the fight against the pipeline both agree that water is a source of life and should be protected.
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