In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a Lakota medicine wheel hangs in the window of a truck outside Pine Ridge High School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a mural outside the Pine Ridge High School can be seen at the school's football stadium in the village of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, students walk home from Pine Ridge High School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a mural depicting Native American imagery can be seen in the village of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a cross sits at the top of a hillside west of the village of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, the sun sets over the Black Hills as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Graffiti on one of the buildings in Whiteclay, Nebraska is seen along the highway from South Dakota to the state line. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Graffiti on one of the buildings in Whiteclay, Nebraska is seen along the highway from South Dakota to the state line. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Bruce BonFluer and Marsha BonFleur operate Lakota Hope Ministry and are some of the few permanent residents of Whiteclay, Nebraska. A view of the grounds at the Lakota Hope Ministry property. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A two-lane highway carries travelers from the dry South Dakota side of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to the beer-only liquor sales village of Whiteclay, Nebraska. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A two-lane highway carries travelers from the dry South Dakota side of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to the beer-only liquor sales village of Whiteclay, Nebraska. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A two-lane highway carries travelers from the dry South Dakota side of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to the beer-only liquor sales town of Whiteclay, Nebraska. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A mural along U.S. Highway 18 on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A crop field along U.S. Highway 18 on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Merchandise for sale at Rosie Freier's Singing Horse Trading Post in Porcupine on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rosie Freier's Singing Horse Trading Post in Porcupine on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A hallway mural at Pine Ridge High School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. High school guidance counselor Dennis Dolezal explains some of the challenges facing college-bound high schoolers can be as simple as being homesick once away from the region, to more complex hurdles like navigating financial aid programs, noting that over 95-percent of the school's students are considered impoverished. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of a classroom at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the computer lab at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Many of the student's lockers are decorated to celebrate  athletic achievements and college acceptance letters at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation.
 A view of the badlands land formations on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the badlands land formations on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Rolling hills, jagged badlands and expansive prairie make up the rural Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A mural painted on a workshop garage at Thunder Valley. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Marie Kills Warrior, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, shows the greenhouse that was built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Demetrius Blacksmith, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on a roof of one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Aaron Black Bull, left and Chyler Weston, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, move lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Chyler Weston, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, moves lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Aaron Black Bull, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, moves lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of one of the homes being built by the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Aaron Black Bull, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, moves lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Chyler Weston, left, and Jessica Yellowhawk, center, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, work on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Charles (Chuck) Good Voice Elk, second from left, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Demetrius Blacksmith, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, talks with grounds crews below on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Charles (Chuck) Good Voice Elk, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, talks with grounds crews below on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view the housing area being built by the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the chicken coop, greenhouse, offices and meeting areas, as seen from one of the rooftops of a home being built by the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Demetrius Blacksmith, bottom right, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, talks with grounds crews below on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Pernell "Casper" Shoulders, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Members of the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Latrell Heart, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Marie Kills Warrior, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on the grounds surrounding the chicken coop on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Chickens will be raised to aid the sustainability goals of the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation. In addition to chickens, the organization will be growing produce that will be consumed by the community's residents. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the newly-built chicken coop on site. Chickens will be raised to aid the sustainability goals of the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation. In addition to chickens, the organization will be growing produce that will be consumed by the community's residents. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the gymnasium at Little Wound High School in Kyle on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservationin South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the gymnasium at Little Wound High School in Kyle on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservationin South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A roadside memorial as seen on the highway outside of Kyle on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 April Janis, 33, weaves dyed porcupine quills for a knife handle wrap that is is making in her regalia class on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, at Oglala Lakota College in Porcupine, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Oglala Lakota College student April Janis, lays out her dyed porcupine quills for a project on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Porcupine, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a Lakota medicine wheel hangs in the window of a truck outside Pine Ridge High School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a Lakota medicine wheel hangs in the window of a truck outside Pine Ridge High School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a mural outside the Pine Ridge High School can be seen at the school's football stadium in the village of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a mural outside the Pine Ridge High School can be seen at the school's football stadium in the village of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, students walk home from Pine Ridge High School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, students walk home from Pine Ridge High School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a mural depicting Native American imagery can be seen in the village of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a mural depicting Native American imagery can be seen in the village of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a cross sits at the top of a hillside west of the village of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, a cross sits at the top of a hillside west of the village of Pine Ridge on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, the sun sets over the Black Hills as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 photo, the sun sets over the Black Hills as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Graffiti on one of the buildings in Whiteclay, Nebraska is seen along the highway from South Dakota to the state line. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Graffiti on one of the buildings in Whiteclay, Nebraska is seen along the highway from South Dakota to the state line. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Graffiti on one of the buildings in Whiteclay, Nebraska is seen along the highway from South Dakota to the state line. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Graffiti on one of the buildings in Whiteclay, Nebraska is seen along the highway from South Dakota to the state line. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Bruce BonFluer and Marsha BonFleur operate Lakota Hope Ministry and are some of the few permanent residents of Whiteclay, Nebraska. A view of the grounds at the Lakota Hope Ministry property. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Bruce BonFluer and Marsha BonFleur operate Lakota Hope Ministry and are some of the few permanent residents of Whiteclay, Nebraska. A view of the grounds at the Lakota Hope Ministry property. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A two-lane highway carries travelers from the dry South Dakota side of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to the beer-only liquor sales village of Whiteclay, Nebraska. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A two-lane highway carries travelers from the dry South Dakota side of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to the beer-only liquor sales village of Whiteclay, Nebraska. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A two-lane highway carries travelers from the dry South Dakota side of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to the beer-only liquor sales village of Whiteclay, Nebraska. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A two-lane highway carries travelers from the dry South Dakota side of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to the beer-only liquor sales village of Whiteclay, Nebraska. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A two-lane highway carries travelers from the dry South Dakota side of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to the beer-only liquor sales town of Whiteclay, Nebraska. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A two-lane highway carries travelers from the dry South Dakota side of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation to the beer-only liquor sales town of Whiteclay, Nebraska. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A mural along U.S. Highway 18 on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A mural along U.S. Highway 18 on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A crop field along U.S. Highway 18 on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A crop field along U.S. Highway 18 on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Merchandise for sale at Rosie Freier's Singing Horse Trading Post in Porcupine on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Merchandise for sale at Rosie Freier's Singing Horse Trading Post in Porcupine on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rosie Freier's Singing Horse Trading Post in Porcupine on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Rosie Freier's Singing Horse Trading Post in Porcupine on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Nebraska Liquor Control Commission will decide during an April 6 hearing whether or not the four beer-only liquor sales stores of Whiteclay, Nebraska, will continue to sell beer on the only portion of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation that is not dry. The unincorporated village has had a long and divided history of alcohol-related problems. Some community members blame alcoholism as a major contributor to other social, economic and health issues plaguing the reservation. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A hallway mural at Pine Ridge High School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. High school guidance counselor Dennis Dolezal explains some of the challenges facing college-bound high schoolers can be as simple as being homesick once away from the region, to more complex hurdles like navigating financial aid programs, noting that over 95-percent of the school's students are considered impoverished. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A hallway mural at Pine Ridge High School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. High school guidance counselor Dennis Dolezal explains some of the challenges facing college-bound high schoolers can be as simple as being homesick once away from the region, to more complex hurdles like navigating financial aid programs, noting that over 95-percent of the school's students are considered impoverished. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of a classroom at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of a classroom at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the computer lab at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of the computer lab at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Many of the student's lockers are decorated to celebrate  athletic achievements and college acceptance letters at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Many of the student's lockers are decorated to celebrate athletic achievements and college acceptance letters at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation.
A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation.
 A view of the badlands land formations on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of the badlands land formations on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the badlands land formations on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of the badlands land formations on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Rolling hills, jagged badlands and expansive prairie make up the rural Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Rolling hills, jagged badlands and expansive prairie make up the rural Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A mural painted on a workshop garage at Thunder Valley. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A mural painted on a workshop garage at Thunder Valley. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Marie Kills Warrior, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, shows the greenhouse that was built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Marie Kills Warrior, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, shows the greenhouse that was built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Demetrius Blacksmith, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on a roof of one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Demetrius Blacksmith, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on a roof of one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Aaron Black Bull, left and Chyler Weston, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, move lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Aaron Black Bull, left and Chyler Weston, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, move lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Chyler Weston, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, moves lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Chyler Weston, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, moves lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Aaron Black Bull, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, moves lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Aaron Black Bull, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, moves lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of one of the homes being built by the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of one of the homes being built by the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Aaron Black Bull, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, moves lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Aaron Black Bull, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, moves lumber while working on one of the homes being built for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Chyler Weston, left, and Jessica Yellowhawk, center, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, work on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Chyler Weston, left, and Jessica Yellowhawk, center, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, work on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Charles (Chuck) Good Voice Elk, second from left, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Charles (Chuck) Good Voice Elk, second from left, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Demetrius Blacksmith, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, talks with grounds crews below on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Demetrius Blacksmith, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, talks with grounds crews below on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Charles (Chuck) Good Voice Elk, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, talks with grounds crews below on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Charles (Chuck) Good Voice Elk, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, talks with grounds crews below on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view the housing area being built by the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view the housing area being built by the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the chicken coop, greenhouse, offices and meeting areas, as seen from one of the rooftops of a home being built by the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of the chicken coop, greenhouse, offices and meeting areas, as seen from one of the rooftops of a home being built by the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program for the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Demetrius Blacksmith, bottom right, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, talks with grounds crews below on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Demetrius Blacksmith, bottom right, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, talks with grounds crews below on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Pernell "Casper" Shoulders, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Pernell "Casper" Shoulders, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Members of the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Members of the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Latrell Heart, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Latrell Heart, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Marie Kills Warrior, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on the grounds surrounding the chicken coop on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Marie Kills Warrior, with the Thunder Valley Workforce Development Program, works on the grounds surrounding the chicken coop on site at the organization's sustainable community currently being developed on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Chickens will be raised to aid the sustainability goals of the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation. In addition to chickens, the organization will be growing produce that will be consumed by the community's residents. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Chickens will be raised to aid the sustainability goals of the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation. In addition to chickens, the organization will be growing produce that will be consumed by the community's residents. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the newly-built chicken coop on site. Chickens will be raised to aid the sustainability goals of the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation. In addition to chickens, the organization will be growing produce that will be consumed by the community's residents. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of the newly-built chicken coop on site. Chickens will be raised to aid the sustainability goals of the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation. In addition to chickens, the organization will be growing produce that will be consumed by the community's residents. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the gymnasium at Little Wound High School in Kyle on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservationin South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of the gymnasium at Little Wound High School in Kyle on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservationin South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of the gymnasium at Little Wound High School in Kyle on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservationin South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of the gymnasium at Little Wound High School in Kyle on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservationin South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A roadside memorial as seen on the highway outside of Kyle on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A roadside memorial as seen on the highway outside of Kyle on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 April Janis, 33, weaves dyed porcupine quills for a knife handle wrap that is is making in her regalia class on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, at Oglala Lakota College in Porcupine, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
April Janis, 33, weaves dyed porcupine quills for a knife handle wrap that is is making in her regalia class on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, at Oglala Lakota College in Porcupine, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Oglala Lakota College student April Janis, lays out her dyed porcupine quills for a project on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Porcupine, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Oglala Lakota College student April Janis, lays out her dyed porcupine quills for a project on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Porcupine, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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