A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
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 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Kyle Heinrich with Nabors Industry is a drilling rig employee working on a job site outside of Douglas, Wyo. Heinrich is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. The property is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of a community bulletin board on display at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in Ekalaka, Montana. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A wind farm is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A harvested corn field is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Judith LeBlanc, with Native Organizers Alliance, gathers supplies for the Four Directions headquarters where staff and volunteers will be stationed over the next few weeks to get Indigenous voters to the polls on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Margerite is seen here at her home in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
 The Garage is a coworking space located in what was a long a mechanic garage. The space now hosts a variety of community events, private offices, and shared common area that is rented by local businesses for workspace.
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown. Bicycles are available for rent in the Main Street Square parking garage.
 A view of a tiled mural inside the Spirit Lake Tribe headquarters in Fort Totten, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Filmmaker Teena Pugliese, left, works with Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle to film a get out the vote video that will be shared on social media. In her role as Miss Standing Rock, Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle especially encouraged young voters to get to the polls on election day. The women worked out of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe tribal council room in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Students Atheina, age 17, grade 11, left, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, practice memorizing a class speech during class at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. During class, students are often seen with items like fidget spinners, modeling clay, or even moon sand and plush toys as pictured here. Engaging with these items while working in class has shown to help students stay focused on their tasks. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
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 Student Aeriel, age 17, working towards HiSET, talks with family on the phone from a common area in a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 From left, students Shantell, age 18, working toward HiSET, Lacey, age 16, grade 10, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, follow along during a guided tapping class, a form of guided mindfulness, at a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Julie Trask semen tests bulls at client Marvin Willaims' ranch near Owanka. The process begins with Trask and Williams moving bulls into a holding chute where Trask then inserts an electric probe into the bull's rear. When the electric probe is turned on, the electric pulses cause the bull to become erect, making it possible for Trask to get a semen sample. The sample, along with measurements of the bull's scrotum and observations about their hooves tells Trask the strength and virility of each bull. That information will then be used by Williams for his own cattle operation's breeding purses or when he goes to sell the bulls.
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
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 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer with her 12-year-old daughter Cadence Kilmer at the family's home in Spearfish, South Dakota on Tuesday evening, Oct. 2, 2018.
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Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer spreads out her daily medications, including Lynparza, center, which costs nearly $17,000 per month.
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 Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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021408.Marriage1.jpgBob and Thelma Knutson pose for a portrait at their kitchen table in their Rapid City on Dec. 30, 2008. The Knutsons met in Scenic and have been married for almost 62 years.
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MERRILLFARMSChores around the farm vary from day to day, but on this particular day one of Bob's chores included moving the large irrigation sprinkler in the alfalfa field so it would be out of the way for cutting in the coming days. The sprinkler movement is controlled by a large motor. Bob is seen here at the field outside of Parker, South Dakota on May 23, 2018.
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 Kyle Heinrich with Nabors Industry is a drilling rig employee working on a job site outside of Douglas, Wyo. Heinrich is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Kyle Heinrich with Nabors Industry is a drilling rig employee working on a job site outside of Douglas, Wyo. Heinrich is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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092410.Homecoming1.jpgFrom left, Rapid City Central seniors Haylee Hansen, Sarah Meyer, and Alexa McCoy sit in the back of Hansen's car while waiting to line up for the caravan to O'Harra Stadium for Friday night's homecoming game against Sioux Falls Washington on September 24, 2010. (Kristina Barker/Journal staff)
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082910.CenturyFarm010.JPGJared, 8, Jana, 5, and Kaelyn Stearns, 9, walk up the hill from their home to where the barns and original homestead stand. The youngest Stearns are learning the ropes of a working ranch, following in the footsteps of their great-great-grandfather Frank Stearns who homesteaded south of Edgemont in 1910. (Kristina Barker/Journal staff) SUNDAY SPECIAL
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122110.Feature.JPGJosh Adams, Sturgis, slides into a turn while riding his motocross bike across a frozen Bear Butte Lake on Tuesday afternoon, December 21, 2010. Adams and a friend were inspired to try the winter style of riding after seeing other dirt bikers taking advantage of the ice. "It's a blast," Adams said. (Kristina Barker/Journal staff)
 The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. The property is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. The property is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of a community bulletin board on display at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in Ekalaka, Montana. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of a community bulletin board on display at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in Ekalaka, Montana. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A wind farm is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A wind farm is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A harvested corn field is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A harvested corn field is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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BestOfFair006Sentel Johnson, 13, Belle Fourche, kisses Beamer while tending to horses at the Central States Fair on Thursday, August 19, 2010. (Kristina Barker/Journal staff)
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110911.SpringCreek1.jpgThird-grader Annika Kruger, left, and her brother Ben Kruger, a seventh-grader, take down the flag at the end of the school day at Spring Creek Elementary on Thursday afternoon, Nov. 9, 2011. On Monday, Nov. 14, the Custer School Board of Education will decide whether or not to close the school. (Kristina Barker/Journal staff)
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 Judith LeBlanc, with Native Organizers Alliance, gathers supplies for the Four Directions headquarters where staff and volunteers will be stationed over the next few weeks to get Indigenous voters to the polls on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Judith LeBlanc, with Native Organizers Alliance, gathers supplies for the Four Directions headquarters where staff and volunteers will be stationed over the next few weeks to get Indigenous voters to the polls on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Margerite is seen here at her home in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
Margerite is seen here at her home in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
 The Garage is a coworking space located in what was a long a mechanic garage. The space now hosts a variety of community events, private offices, and shared common area that is rented by local businesses for workspace.
The Garage is a coworking space located in what was a long a mechanic garage. The space now hosts a variety of community events, private offices, and shared common area that is rented by local businesses for workspace.
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown. Bicycles are available for rent in the Main Street Square parking garage.
The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown. Bicycles are available for rent in the Main Street Square parking garage.
 A view of a tiled mural inside the Spirit Lake Tribe headquarters in Fort Totten, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of a tiled mural inside the Spirit Lake Tribe headquarters in Fort Totten, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Filmmaker Teena Pugliese, left, works with Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle to film a get out the vote video that will be shared on social media. In her role as Miss Standing Rock, Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle especially encouraged young voters to get to the polls on election day. The women worked out of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe tribal council room in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Filmmaker Teena Pugliese, left, works with Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle to film a get out the vote video that will be shared on social media. In her role as Miss Standing Rock, Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle especially encouraged young voters to get to the polls on election day. The women worked out of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe tribal council room in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Students Atheina, age 17, grade 11, left, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, practice memorizing a class speech during class at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. During class, students are often seen with items like fidget spinners, modeling clay, or even moon sand and plush toys as pictured here. Engaging with these items while working in class has shown to help students stay focused on their tasks. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Students Atheina, age 17, grade 11, left, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, practice memorizing a class speech during class at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. During class, students are often seen with items like fidget spinners, modeling clay, or even moon sand and plush toys as pictured here. Engaging with these items while working in class has shown to help students stay focused on their tasks. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
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 Student Aeriel, age 17, working towards HiSET, talks with family on the phone from a common area in a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Student Aeriel, age 17, working towards HiSET, talks with family on the phone from a common area in a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 From left, students Shantell, age 18, working toward HiSET, Lacey, age 16, grade 10, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, follow along during a guided tapping class, a form of guided mindfulness, at a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
From left, students Shantell, age 18, working toward HiSET, Lacey, age 16, grade 10, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, follow along during a guided tapping class, a form of guided mindfulness, at a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Julie Trask semen tests bulls at client Marvin Willaims' ranch near Owanka. The process begins with Trask and Williams moving bulls into a holding chute where Trask then inserts an electric probe into the bull's rear. When the electric probe is turned on, the electric pulses cause the bull to become erect, making it possible for Trask to get a semen sample. The sample, along with measurements of the bull's scrotum and observations about their hooves tells Trask the strength and virility of each bull. That information will then be used by Williams for his own cattle operation's breeding purses or when he goes to sell the bulls.
Julie Trask semen tests bulls at client Marvin Willaims' ranch near Owanka. The process begins with Trask and Williams moving bulls into a holding chute where Trask then inserts an electric probe into the bull's rear. When the electric probe is turned on, the electric pulses cause the bull to become erect, making it possible for Trask to get a semen sample. The sample, along with measurements of the bull's scrotum and observations about their hooves tells Trask the strength and virility of each bull. That information will then be used by Williams for his own cattle operation's breeding purses or when he goes to sell the bulls.
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