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 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown. Bicycles are available for rent in the Main Street Square parking garage.
 The Garage is a coworking space located in what was a long a mechanic garage. The space now hosts a variety of community events, private offices, and shared common area that is rented by local businesses for workspace.
 Light from the setting sun washes over the sky above Rapid City after an August thunderstorm.
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 The setting sun washes light over clouds above Wyoming Highway 59 near the Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
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 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
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 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 The sun sets on the Conata Basin overlook in Badlands National Park.
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 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of the North Dakota badlands, the backdrop for the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown. Bicycles are available for rent in the Main Street Square parking garage.
The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown. Bicycles are available for rent in the Main Street Square parking garage.
 The Garage is a coworking space located in what was a long a mechanic garage. The space now hosts a variety of community events, private offices, and shared common area that is rented by local businesses for workspace.
The Garage is a coworking space located in what was a long a mechanic garage. The space now hosts a variety of community events, private offices, and shared common area that is rented by local businesses for workspace.
 Light from the setting sun washes over the sky above Rapid City after an August thunderstorm.
Light from the setting sun washes over the sky above Rapid City after an August thunderstorm.
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 The setting sun washes light over clouds above Wyoming Highway 59 near the Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The setting sun washes light over clouds above Wyoming Highway 59 near the Eagle Butte coal mine as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. The mine, operated by Alpha Coal West, Inc., is one of about a dozen mines in the Gillette, Wyoming area. Alpha Natural Resources, Inc., filed for bankruptcy in August 2015. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
GroundedTouchMassage019.JPG
 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
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 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 The sun sets on the Conata Basin overlook in Badlands National Park.
The sun sets on the Conata Basin overlook in Badlands National Park.
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 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
GroundedTouchMassage046.JPG
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 The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of the North Dakota badlands, the backdrop for the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
A view of the North Dakota badlands, the backdrop for the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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