An electronic voting machine is set up at the polling center at the Caputa Community Center on Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014 in Caputa, S.D.
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
041511-Calving008.JPG
 Julie lives in her grandmother's 1943 Sears and Roebuck kit house, assembled by the previous and first owner of the home.
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 A view along South Dakota Highway 71 outside Hot Springs. Rural water needs include not only tap water but agriculture and fire suppression. The Southern Black Hills Water System in southwestern South Dakota delivers water to area residents across Fall River and Custer counties. With about 120 miles of pipeline in the water system, the terrain of rolling prairie, with it's rugged rocky slopes, paired with the cascading cliffs and high outcroppings of the Black Hills has made development challenging and costly. Now in its thirteenth year, the water system serves nearly 400 taps.
BestOfStaff024.JPG
041511-Calving009.JPG
 Decor in Julie's mudroom
061415-AJAM002.JPG
BestOfStaff027.JPG
KristinaBarker009.JPG
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
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 Julie Trask's cousin Mick Trask helps her get control of stud horses in preparation for castrating. The horses are given a medication to help calm them before they are given a medication to sedate them for the quick field surgery.
 In this Dec. 16, 2014 photo, Bryan Silvernail, an infrastructure tech operating the elevator lift, makes a stop in the Yates Shaft at the 3,800-level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, S.D. While the 3,800-level is not being used as a lab, Silvernail made the stop while on the way up to the surface to show how the hundreds of miles of tunnels looked when the facility was being used as a gold mine.
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 In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, Rosebud Sioux Tribe Council Representative Wayne Frederick, left, his wife Alex Frederick, and Gary Dorr brand a calf on the Frederick's ranch outside Winner, S.D. "This is our only island - our land," Wayne Frederick explains about how important it is to keep the tribe's land healthy and thriving. Some tribal members and area residents believe that the proposed Keystone XL pipeline could be disastrous to the area's heavily-relied upon clean water supply.
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 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered.
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 Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
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052109-BrianJansen004.JPG
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 An electronic voting machine is set up at the polling center at the Caputa Community Center on Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014 in Caputa, S.D.
An electronic voting machine is set up at the polling center at the Caputa Community Center on Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014 in Caputa, S.D.
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
041511-Calving008.JPG
 Julie lives in her grandmother's 1943 Sears and Roebuck kit house, assembled by the previous and first owner of the home.
Julie lives in her grandmother's 1943 Sears and Roebuck kit house, assembled by the previous and first owner of the home.
BestOfRoundUp022.JPG
 A view along South Dakota Highway 71 outside Hot Springs. Rural water needs include not only tap water but agriculture and fire suppression. The Southern Black Hills Water System in southwestern South Dakota delivers water to area residents across Fall River and Custer counties. With about 120 miles of pipeline in the water system, the terrain of rolling prairie, with it's rugged rocky slopes, paired with the cascading cliffs and high outcroppings of the Black Hills has made development challenging and costly. Now in its thirteenth year, the water system serves nearly 400 taps.
A view along South Dakota Highway 71 outside Hot Springs. Rural water needs include not only tap water but agriculture and fire suppression. The Southern Black Hills Water System in southwestern South Dakota delivers water to area residents across Fall River and Custer counties. With about 120 miles of pipeline in the water system, the terrain of rolling prairie, with it's rugged rocky slopes, paired with the cascading cliffs and high outcroppings of the Black Hills has made development challenging and costly. Now in its thirteenth year, the water system serves nearly 400 taps.
BestOfStaff024.JPG
041511-Calving009.JPG
 Decor in Julie's mudroom
Decor in Julie's mudroom
061415-AJAM002.JPG
BestOfStaff027.JPG
KristinaBarker009.JPG
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
082711-Grace1.JPG
_MG_5074.JPG
 Julie Trask's cousin Mick Trask helps her get control of stud horses in preparation for castrating. The horses are given a medication to help calm them before they are given a medication to sedate them for the quick field surgery.
Julie Trask's cousin Mick Trask helps her get control of stud horses in preparation for castrating. The horses are given a medication to help calm them before they are given a medication to sedate them for the quick field surgery.
 In this Dec. 16, 2014 photo, Bryan Silvernail, an infrastructure tech operating the elevator lift, makes a stop in the Yates Shaft at the 3,800-level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, S.D. While the 3,800-level is not being used as a lab, Silvernail made the stop while on the way up to the surface to show how the hundreds of miles of tunnels looked when the facility was being used as a gold mine.
In this Dec. 16, 2014 photo, Bryan Silvernail, an infrastructure tech operating the elevator lift, makes a stop in the Yates Shaft at the 3,800-level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, S.D. While the 3,800-level is not being used as a lab, Silvernail made the stop while on the way up to the surface to show how the hundreds of miles of tunnels looked when the facility was being used as a gold mine.
040414-YFSfriday0039.JPG
082709-Rodeo007.JPG
Singles_014.JPG
 In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, Rosebud Sioux Tribe Council Representative Wayne Frederick, left, his wife Alex Frederick, and Gary Dorr brand a calf on the Frederick's ranch outside Winner, S.D. "This is our only island - our land," Wayne Frederick explains about how important it is to keep the tribe's land healthy and thriving. Some tribal members and area residents believe that the proposed Keystone XL pipeline could be disastrous to the area's heavily-relied upon clean water supply.
In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, Rosebud Sioux Tribe Council Representative Wayne Frederick, left, his wife Alex Frederick, and Gary Dorr brand a calf on the Frederick's ranch outside Winner, S.D. "This is our only island - our land," Wayne Frederick explains about how important it is to keep the tribe's land healthy and thriving. Some tribal members and area residents believe that the proposed Keystone XL pipeline could be disastrous to the area's heavily-relied upon clean water supply.
052111-Branding004.JPG
Singles_018.JPG
 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered.
The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered.
052109-BrianJansen010.JPG
 Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
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070509-Joy024.JPG
052109-BrianJansen004.JPG
040414-YFSfriday0054.JPG
052308-CusterFish1.JPG
031312-OldRanchers026.JPG
CenturyFarm_006.JPG
090709-Newell004.JPG
StockPhotos024.JPG
022615-PineRidge002.JPG
070509-Joy032.JPG
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