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 The cast takes the stage during a performance of the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan gets ready in his dressing room before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 The cast of the Medora Musical during a recent performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Magnets on display in the Medora Musical theatre gift shop. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan tunes his guitar backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 As the show wraps, a final rider climbs with a horse to the top of the bluff behind the Medora Musical stage. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan waves to a tour group backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 (from left) Albert Diem, 12, Carter Ehlis, 13, Morgan Ehlis, 15, Phoebe Diem, 15, and Sunshine Diem, 14, all from Dickinson, N.D., visit during intermission at the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Elk on the bluff behind the Medora Musical theatre stage signal the beginning of the show, with guests beginning to take their seats as the crew finishes final prep. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Audience members visit with cast members following the performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Sloane Heersche, 3, left, and sister Aeris Heersche, 5, both of Chicago, get a closer look at the stage during intermission. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kally Wagner, 14, center, Nizhoni Lawton, 11, and Haesha Charette, 12, right, have a snack in the shade while riding horses in Crow Agency, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rural roads, open prairie and rolling hills weave together the sparsely populated area near Decker, Montana, home to several coal mining operations. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Red Cloud High School student Jacob Rosales is celebrated for his academic achievements that are providing him with post-high school educational opportunities. Rosales is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Red Cloud High School student Araceli Spotted Thunder is celebrated for her academic achievements that are providing her with post-high school educational opportunities. Spotted Thunder is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation.
 A view of the computer lab at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Biology teacher Katie Montez, standing, works with students on a lesson during class at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Thunder Valley Workforce Development crew members gather to discuss the day's objectives and progress on the sustainable community being built on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Andrew Iron Shell, Community Engagement Coordinator, speaks about the work being done by the Thunder Valley Community Development Center teams working to build the  organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
 WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
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 National Players actors take the state to a sold-out crowd for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The Rolling Rez bus is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Martin, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. First Peoples Fund has partnered with several organizations to fund a bus that travels the reservation for scheduled stops throughout the year, providing a place for artists to bring their work and sell to one of the reservation's cultural museums, The Heritage Center at Red Cloud Indian School. Without Rolling Rez, some artists would not have access to an art buyer or would be unable to travel the far distance to Red Cloud due to the remote, rural nature of the reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A roadside art stand near the site of the Wounded Knee Massacre is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. During the summer tourism months, local artists are often seen at these types of road side stands. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Artist Dick Termes with his spherical paintings at his studio, Termesphere Gallery, on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Termes first became involved with the National Endowment for the Arts in the early 1970s. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 National Players actors Shawn Morgenlander, left, Claire Allegra Taylor, center, and Allyson Boate, right, get ready for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 The cast takes the stage during a performance of the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
The cast takes the stage during a performance of the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan gets ready in his dressing room before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan gets ready in his dressing room before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 The cast of the Medora Musical during a recent performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
The cast of the Medora Musical during a recent performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Magnets on display in the Medora Musical theatre gift shop. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Magnets on display in the Medora Musical theatre gift shop. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan tunes his guitar backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan tunes his guitar backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 As the show wraps, a final rider climbs with a horse to the top of the bluff behind the Medora Musical stage. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
As the show wraps, a final rider climbs with a horse to the top of the bluff behind the Medora Musical stage. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan waves to a tour group backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan waves to a tour group backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 (from left) Albert Diem, 12, Carter Ehlis, 13, Morgan Ehlis, 15, Phoebe Diem, 15, and Sunshine Diem, 14, all from Dickinson, N.D., visit during intermission at the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
(from left) Albert Diem, 12, Carter Ehlis, 13, Morgan Ehlis, 15, Phoebe Diem, 15, and Sunshine Diem, 14, all from Dickinson, N.D., visit during intermission at the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Elk on the bluff behind the Medora Musical theatre stage signal the beginning of the show, with guests beginning to take their seats as the crew finishes final prep. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Elk on the bluff behind the Medora Musical theatre stage signal the beginning of the show, with guests beginning to take their seats as the crew finishes final prep. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Audience members visit with cast members following the performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Audience members visit with cast members following the performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Sloane Heersche, 3, left, and sister Aeris Heersche, 5, both of Chicago, get a closer look at the stage during intermission. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Sloane Heersche, 3, left, and sister Aeris Heersche, 5, both of Chicago, get a closer look at the stage during intermission. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kally Wagner, 14, center, Nizhoni Lawton, 11, and Haesha Charette, 12, right, have a snack in the shade while riding horses in Crow Agency, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Kally Wagner, 14, center, Nizhoni Lawton, 11, and Haesha Charette, 12, right, have a snack in the shade while riding horses in Crow Agency, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rural roads, open prairie and rolling hills weave together the sparsely populated area near Decker, Montana, home to several coal mining operations. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Rural roads, open prairie and rolling hills weave together the sparsely populated area near Decker, Montana, home to several coal mining operations. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Red Cloud High School student Jacob Rosales is celebrated for his academic achievements that are providing him with post-high school educational opportunities. Rosales is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Red Cloud High School student Jacob Rosales is celebrated for his academic achievements that are providing him with post-high school educational opportunities. Rosales is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Red Cloud High School student Araceli Spotted Thunder is celebrated for her academic achievements that are providing her with post-high school educational opportunities. Spotted Thunder is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Red Cloud High School student Araceli Spotted Thunder is celebrated for her academic achievements that are providing her with post-high school educational opportunities. Spotted Thunder is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation.
A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation.
 A view of the computer lab at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of the computer lab at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Biology teacher Katie Montez, standing, works with students on a lesson during class at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Biology teacher Katie Montez, standing, works with students on a lesson during class at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Thunder Valley Workforce Development crew members gather to discuss the day's objectives and progress on the sustainable community being built on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Thunder Valley Workforce Development crew members gather to discuss the day's objectives and progress on the sustainable community being built on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Andrew Iron Shell, Community Engagement Coordinator, speaks about the work being done by the Thunder Valley Community Development Center teams working to build the  organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Andrew Iron Shell, Community Engagement Coordinator, speaks about the work being done by the Thunder Valley Community Development Center teams working to build the organization's sustainable community on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
 WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
WeCopwatch co-founders David Whitt, pictured here, and Jakob Crawford at the 150th annual Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Wacipi in Sisseton, South Dakota on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Whitt and Crawford will be spending several weeks traveling across the Dakotas in their camper to train Native community members on their rights to film upon being stopped, questioned or detained by law enforcement. The pair�s work in the Dakotas is an extension of their organization�s time and efforts at the Oceti Sakowin Camp where they provided resources and education to water protectors protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline. The feature-length documentary �Copwatch,� a film that profiles WeCopwatch members, premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times.)
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 National Players actors take the state to a sold-out crowd for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
National Players actors take the state to a sold-out crowd for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The Rolling Rez bus is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Martin, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. First Peoples Fund has partnered with several organizations to fund a bus that travels the reservation for scheduled stops throughout the year, providing a place for artists to bring their work and sell to one of the reservation's cultural museums, The Heritage Center at Red Cloud Indian School. Without Rolling Rez, some artists would not have access to an art buyer or would be unable to travel the far distance to Red Cloud due to the remote, rural nature of the reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The Rolling Rez bus is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Martin, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. First Peoples Fund has partnered with several organizations to fund a bus that travels the reservation for scheduled stops throughout the year, providing a place for artists to bring their work and sell to one of the reservation's cultural museums, The Heritage Center at Red Cloud Indian School. Without Rolling Rez, some artists would not have access to an art buyer or would be unable to travel the far distance to Red Cloud due to the remote, rural nature of the reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A roadside art stand near the site of the Wounded Knee Massacre is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. During the summer tourism months, local artists are often seen at these types of road side stands. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A roadside art stand near the site of the Wounded Knee Massacre is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. During the summer tourism months, local artists are often seen at these types of road side stands. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Artist Dick Termes with his spherical paintings at his studio, Termesphere Gallery, on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Termes first became involved with the National Endowment for the Arts in the early 1970s. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Artist Dick Termes with his spherical paintings at his studio, Termesphere Gallery, on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Termes first became involved with the National Endowment for the Arts in the early 1970s. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 National Players actors Shawn Morgenlander, left, Claire Allegra Taylor, center, and Allyson Boate, right, get ready for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
National Players actors Shawn Morgenlander, left, Claire Allegra Taylor, center, and Allyson Boate, right, get ready for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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