Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, center right, thanks guests and community members at the end of her rally at Prairie Knights Casino & Resort on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation on Sunday, Oct. 21, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Judith LeBlanc, with Native Organizers Alliance, left, and OJ Semans, with Four Directions, arrive at the Four Directions voting headquarters in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. LeBlanc and Semans are working closely with tribal officials, community leaders, staff, and grassroots volunteers to bring Native voters to the polls on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Robin Smith presents Merle White Tail with his new identification card while working in the enrollment office at Spirit Lake in Fort Totten, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Jenny Ghost Bear, with Four Directions, talks about her motivation to work with the organization to help bring change to her community and to empower to fellow community members. Ghost Bear is seen here at the Four Directions voting headquarters on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018 in Fort Yates, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Phyllis Young, a longtime and well-known and respected community activist, talks about the challenges facing Indigenous voters in the upcoming election, most notably the requirement to prove one's physical address. Young is seen here in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Judith LeBlanc, with Native Organizers Alliance, gathers supplies for the Four Directions headquarters where staff and volunteers will be stationed over the next few weeks to get Indigenous voters to the polls on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Barb Semans, left, and OJ Semans, both with Four Directions, leaves the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa headquarters in Belcourt, North Dakota after discussing strategies and action items the grassroots organization has been doing to encourage and ensure Indigenous community members can vote on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Filmmaker Teena Pugliese, left, works with Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle to film a get out the vote video that will be shared on social media. In her role as Miss Standing Rock, Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle especially encouraged young voters to get to the polls on election day. The women worked out of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe tribal council room in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Enrollment office employee and elder Winona Fox, left, works with Spirit Lake Secretary-Treasurer Lonna Jackson-Street to find a list of how many residents have some to the office in recent days to obtain their physical address in order to vote on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of a tiled mural inside the Spirit Lake Tribe headquarters in Fort Totten, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Oceti Sakowin camp, the site of the historic gathering of water protectors outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota, as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A harvested corn field is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A wind farm is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train travels north of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. Natural resources help to drive a major portion of the rural West's regional economies. A drill rig can be seen in the background. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kyle Heinrich with Nabors Industry is a drilling rig employee working on a job site outside of Douglas, Wyo. Heinrich is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Rancher Jay Butler, like many Wyoming residents, sees the very tangible benefits to the state's communities from natural resource companies extracting minerals and oil from the land. At the same time, Butler also sees the need for continued scrutiny, regulation and responsibility on the part of the companies and Bureau of Land Management. Butler is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A Chesapeake Energy oil site is seen here from a private ranch road north of Douglas, Wyo. on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 In addition to being paid for leasing their land or being paid royalties for their mineral rights, land owners can also be paid for access to drilling sites on their property, making what rancher Jay Butler refers to as some very expensive "toll roads" that the energy companies have no choice but to utilize. The amount of traffic in the energy and resource-rich Wyoming differs greatly from other parts of the rural state. Traffic is seen here from the back seat of Jay Butler's pickup on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Margerite is seen here at her home in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
 The O'Neill Ventures tomato plant is seen here on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 in O'Neill, Nebraska. In August, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested dozens of employees at the tomato greenhouse, sending a wave of change through the small rural community.
 Bryan Corkle, a local school teacher in O'Neill, Nebraska, is pictured here in his classroom at O'Neill High School on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
 A drilling rig works the beginning stages of getting a well site up and running outside of Douglas, Wyo., as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A natural gas flare is seen as on an oil drilling site in a view of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday evening, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming High Plains District Office waiting room displays some of Wyoming's natural resources, wildlife and recreational activities for office visitors, as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 As natural resource extraction ramps up across the West, offices like the Bureau of Land Management in Casper, Wyo. work to keep up with work loads and the need to grow staff. During a tour in Casper, Wyo. on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, Randy Sorenson dials into a conference call to interview a job candidate. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Despite the abundant vehicle traffic and human activity surrounding the natural resource extraction sites outside of Douglas, Wyo., wildlife like pronghorn antelope were easy to see at all times of the day. Antelope are seen grazing in the sagebrush on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train travels north of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. Natural resources help to drive a major portion of the rural West's regional economies. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Angelica at home with her daughter in O'Neill, Nebraska on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
 Senior Stephanie Gonzales, 17, has been living with her best friend's family in recent weeks in an effort to maintain her rigorous school and extracurricular activity schedules. Gonzales' mother is currently being held after having been arrested during the immigration raid that took dozens of community members away from their jobs and their families. Gonzales is seen here at O'Neill High School in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
 The O'Neill Ventures tomato plant is seen here on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 in O'Neill, Nebraska. In August, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested dozens of employees at the tomato greenhouse, sending a wave of change through the small rural community.
 A view of downtown O'Neill, Nebraska, as seen on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
 A view of downtown O'Neill, Nebraska, as seen on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
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 Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams, center, campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of a community bulletin board on display at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in Ekalaka, Montana. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Montana Highway 7 just north of Ekalaka, Montana. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A play set is seen in a yard in Ekalaka on Sunday morning. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Items for sale on display in the dining area of the Wagon Wheel Cafe. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Ekalaka's Main Street on Sunday morning. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 The Wyoming Girls School is set just beyond the center of town, adjacent to the town's small airport runway and neighboring housing developments. Campus is seen here on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Sheridan, Wyo. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Bridget, age 16, grade 10, right, stretches out on an exercise ball during science class while fellow student Nicole, age 17, grade 12, second from right, looks on at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Students are encouraged to sit where they feel comfortable, and often times that may mean sitting on a desk, on the floor or on an exercise ball. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students Madison, age 18, who has completed her HiSET, left, and graduate Marisa, age 17, take a break to have their lunch after cooking for students and staff at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students and teachers play a game of hockey at the Whitney Rink at the M&M's Center in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. The Wyoming Girls School rents ice time from the center so students are able to participate in a sport that couldn't otherwise be done on campus. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Student artwork hangs in a hallway at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students Atheina, age 17, grade 11, left, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, practice memorizing a class speech during class at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. During class, students are often seen with items like fidget spinners, modeling clay, or even moon sand and plush toys as pictured here. Engaging with these items while working in class has shown to help students stay focused on their tasks. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 A student's locker is decorated with their sobriety tokens, a reminder of the trauma and challenges some of the students at the Wyoming Girls School have faced and are working to overcome during their stay at the school. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 A view of campus as seen from principal Dixie Cooper's office window at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Student Willow, age 18, is seen here in the living room area of her dorm's common space at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Willow has completed her HiSET, or high school equivalency diploma. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 From left, students Shantell, age 18, working toward HiSET, Lacey, age 16, grade 10, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, follow along during a guided tapping class, a form of guided mindfulness, at a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Paraprofessional Kim Wenger is seen waiting in the hallway outside the restroom waiting for a student at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Students are escorted nearly everywhere around the school, including to and from the restroom and the various campus buildings. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students practice good and bad handshake techniques while talking about applying for jobs during an independent living course at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Principal Dixie Cooper, center, visits with students Emily, age 15, grade 8, sitting left, and Kaitlyn, age 15, grade 9, sitting right, during lunch at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students in biology class transfer plants for planting this spring in the on-campus greenhouse garden at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Student Dominique, grade 10, is seen here inside her dorm room at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Dominique will be leaving the school in May. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students are escorted to and from all buildings around campus, as seen here at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Student Aeriel, age 17, working towards HiSET, talks with family on the phone from a common area in a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 From left, students Willow, age 18, graduate Bailey, age 18,  technology and psychology teacher Michelle Nielsen, and student graduate Addie, age 18, take photos of each other to explore works of art on the Google Arts and Culture Face Match during technology class at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 From let, intern therapist Kelly Johnson, student Latavia, age 16, grade 10m youth service specialist Megan Peak, student Emily, age 15, grade 8, and student graduate Marisa, age 17, gather together for art therapy in a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 The Wyoming Girls School is set just beyond the center of town, adjacent to the town's small airport runway and neighboring housing developments. Campus is seen here on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Sheridan, Wyo. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. A view from the top of the elevator shows downtown Rapid City and a city park, as seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. The property is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan gets ready in his dressing room before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 The cast takes the stage during a performance of the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 The cast of the Medora Musical during a recent performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Magnets on display in the Medora Musical theatre gift shop. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan tunes his guitar backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 As the show wraps, a final rider climbs with a horse to the top of the bluff behind the Medora Musical stage. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan waves to a tour group backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 (from left) Albert Diem, 12, Carter Ehlis, 13, Morgan Ehlis, 15, Phoebe Diem, 15, and Sunshine Diem, 14, all from Dickinson, N.D., visit during intermission at the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Elk on the bluff behind the Medora Musical theatre stage signal the beginning of the show, with guests beginning to take their seats as the crew finishes final prep. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Audience members visit with cast members following the performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Sloane Heersche, 3, left, and sister Aeris Heersche, 5, both of Chicago, get a closer look at the stage during intermission. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kally Wagner, 14, center, Nizhoni Lawton, 11, and Haesha Charette, 12, right, have a snack in the shade while riding horses in Crow Agency, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rural roads, open prairie and rolling hills weave together the sparsely populated area near Decker, Montana, home to several coal mining operations. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of the computer lab at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Biology teacher Katie Montez, standing, works with students on a lesson during class at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Thunder Valley Workforce Development crew members gather to discuss the day's objectives and progress on the sustainable community being built on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Red Cloud High School student Jacob Rosales is celebrated for his academic achievements that are providing him with post-high school educational opportunities. Rosales is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, center right, thanks guests and community members at the end of her rally at Prairie Knights Casino & Resort on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation on Sunday, Oct. 21, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, center right, thanks guests and community members at the end of her rally at Prairie Knights Casino & Resort on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation on Sunday, Oct. 21, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Judith LeBlanc, with Native Organizers Alliance, left, and OJ Semans, with Four Directions, arrive at the Four Directions voting headquarters in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. LeBlanc and Semans are working closely with tribal officials, community leaders, staff, and grassroots volunteers to bring Native voters to the polls on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Judith LeBlanc, with Native Organizers Alliance, left, and OJ Semans, with Four Directions, arrive at the Four Directions voting headquarters in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. LeBlanc and Semans are working closely with tribal officials, community leaders, staff, and grassroots volunteers to bring Native voters to the polls on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Robin Smith presents Merle White Tail with his new identification card while working in the enrollment office at Spirit Lake in Fort Totten, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Robin Smith presents Merle White Tail with his new identification card while working in the enrollment office at Spirit Lake in Fort Totten, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Jenny Ghost Bear, with Four Directions, talks about her motivation to work with the organization to help bring change to her community and to empower to fellow community members. Ghost Bear is seen here at the Four Directions voting headquarters on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018 in Fort Yates, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Jenny Ghost Bear, with Four Directions, talks about her motivation to work with the organization to help bring change to her community and to empower to fellow community members. Ghost Bear is seen here at the Four Directions voting headquarters on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018 in Fort Yates, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Phyllis Young, a longtime and well-known and respected community activist, talks about the challenges facing Indigenous voters in the upcoming election, most notably the requirement to prove one's physical address. Young is seen here in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Phyllis Young, a longtime and well-known and respected community activist, talks about the challenges facing Indigenous voters in the upcoming election, most notably the requirement to prove one's physical address. Young is seen here in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Judith LeBlanc, with Native Organizers Alliance, gathers supplies for the Four Directions headquarters where staff and volunteers will be stationed over the next few weeks to get Indigenous voters to the polls on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Judith LeBlanc, with Native Organizers Alliance, gathers supplies for the Four Directions headquarters where staff and volunteers will be stationed over the next few weeks to get Indigenous voters to the polls on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Barb Semans, left, and OJ Semans, both with Four Directions, leaves the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa headquarters in Belcourt, North Dakota after discussing strategies and action items the grassroots organization has been doing to encourage and ensure Indigenous community members can vote on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Barb Semans, left, and OJ Semans, both with Four Directions, leaves the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa headquarters in Belcourt, North Dakota after discussing strategies and action items the grassroots organization has been doing to encourage and ensure Indigenous community members can vote on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Filmmaker Teena Pugliese, left, works with Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle to film a get out the vote video that will be shared on social media. In her role as Miss Standing Rock, Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle especially encouraged young voters to get to the polls on election day. The women worked out of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe tribal council room in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Filmmaker Teena Pugliese, left, works with Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle to film a get out the vote video that will be shared on social media. In her role as Miss Standing Rock, Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle especially encouraged young voters to get to the polls on election day. The women worked out of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe tribal council room in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Enrollment office employee and elder Winona Fox, left, works with Spirit Lake Secretary-Treasurer Lonna Jackson-Street to find a list of how many residents have some to the office in recent days to obtain their physical address in order to vote on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Enrollment office employee and elder Winona Fox, left, works with Spirit Lake Secretary-Treasurer Lonna Jackson-Street to find a list of how many residents have some to the office in recent days to obtain their physical address in order to vote on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of a tiled mural inside the Spirit Lake Tribe headquarters in Fort Totten, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of a tiled mural inside the Spirit Lake Tribe headquarters in Fort Totten, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Oceti Sakowin camp, the site of the historic gathering of water protectors outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota, as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Oceti Sakowin camp, the site of the historic gathering of water protectors outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota, as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A harvested corn field is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A harvested corn field is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A wind farm is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A wind farm is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train travels north of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. Natural resources help to drive a major portion of the rural West's regional economies. A drill rig can be seen in the background. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A coal train travels north of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. Natural resources help to drive a major portion of the rural West's regional economies. A drill rig can be seen in the background. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kyle Heinrich with Nabors Industry is a drilling rig employee working on a job site outside of Douglas, Wyo. Heinrich is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Kyle Heinrich with Nabors Industry is a drilling rig employee working on a job site outside of Douglas, Wyo. Heinrich is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Kristen Kilmer
Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer with her 12-year-old daughter Cadence Kilmer at the family's home in Spearfish, South Dakota on Tuesday evening, Oct. 2, 2018.
Kristen Kilmer
Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer spreads out her daily medications, including Lynparza, center, which costs nearly $17,000 per month.
 Rancher Jay Butler, like many Wyoming residents, sees the very tangible benefits to the state's communities from natural resource companies extracting minerals and oil from the land. At the same time, Butler also sees the need for continued scrutiny, regulation and responsibility on the part of the companies and Bureau of Land Management. Butler is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Rancher Jay Butler, like many Wyoming residents, sees the very tangible benefits to the state's communities from natural resource companies extracting minerals and oil from the land. At the same time, Butler also sees the need for continued scrutiny, regulation and responsibility on the part of the companies and Bureau of Land Management. Butler is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A Chesapeake Energy oil site is seen here from a private ranch road north of Douglas, Wyo. on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A Chesapeake Energy oil site is seen here from a private ranch road north of Douglas, Wyo. on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 In addition to being paid for leasing their land or being paid royalties for their mineral rights, land owners can also be paid for access to drilling sites on their property, making what rancher Jay Butler refers to as some very expensive "toll roads" that the energy companies have no choice but to utilize. The amount of traffic in the energy and resource-rich Wyoming differs greatly from other parts of the rural state. Traffic is seen here from the back seat of Jay Butler's pickup on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
In addition to being paid for leasing their land or being paid royalties for their mineral rights, land owners can also be paid for access to drilling sites on their property, making what rancher Jay Butler refers to as some very expensive "toll roads" that the energy companies have no choice but to utilize. The amount of traffic in the energy and resource-rich Wyoming differs greatly from other parts of the rural state. Traffic is seen here from the back seat of Jay Butler's pickup on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Kristen Kilmer
Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer at her family's home in Spearfish, South Dakota on Tuesday evening, Oct. 2, 2018.
Kristen Kilmer
Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer with her 12-year-old daughter Cadence Kilmer at the family's home in Spearfish, South Dakota on Tuesday evening, Oct. 2, 2018.
Kristen Kilmer
Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer, front, talks about her daughter Cadence Kilmer, 12, back, being a driving force in her care and cancer management. Kilmer lost her mother when she was 15 years old, and she talks openly about not wanting to put her daughter through what she went through at such a young age. Kilmer and her daughter are seen here at the family's home in Spearfish, South Dakota on Tuesday evening, Oct. 2, 2018.
Kristen Kilmer
Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer with her 12-year-old daughter Cadence Kilmer at the family's home in Spearfish, South Dakota on Tuesday evening, Oct. 2, 2018.
 Margerite is seen here at her home in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
Margerite is seen here at her home in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
 The O'Neill Ventures tomato plant is seen here on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 in O'Neill, Nebraska. In August, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested dozens of employees at the tomato greenhouse, sending a wave of change through the small rural community.
The O'Neill Ventures tomato plant is seen here on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 in O'Neill, Nebraska. In August, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested dozens of employees at the tomato greenhouse, sending a wave of change through the small rural community.
 Bryan Corkle, a local school teacher in O'Neill, Nebraska, is pictured here in his classroom at O'Neill High School on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
Bryan Corkle, a local school teacher in O'Neill, Nebraska, is pictured here in his classroom at O'Neill High School on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
 A drilling rig works the beginning stages of getting a well site up and running outside of Douglas, Wyo., as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A drilling rig works the beginning stages of getting a well site up and running outside of Douglas, Wyo., as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A natural gas flare is seen as on an oil drilling site in a view of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday evening, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A natural gas flare is seen as on an oil drilling site in a view of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday evening, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming High Plains District Office waiting room displays some of Wyoming's natural resources, wildlife and recreational activities for office visitors, as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming High Plains District Office waiting room displays some of Wyoming's natural resources, wildlife and recreational activities for office visitors, as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 As natural resource extraction ramps up across the West, offices like the Bureau of Land Management in Casper, Wyo. work to keep up with work loads and the need to grow staff. During a tour in Casper, Wyo. on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, Randy Sorenson dials into a conference call to interview a job candidate. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
As natural resource extraction ramps up across the West, offices like the Bureau of Land Management in Casper, Wyo. work to keep up with work loads and the need to grow staff. During a tour in Casper, Wyo. on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, Randy Sorenson dials into a conference call to interview a job candidate. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Despite the abundant vehicle traffic and human activity surrounding the natural resource extraction sites outside of Douglas, Wyo., wildlife like pronghorn antelope were easy to see at all times of the day. Antelope are seen grazing in the sagebrush on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Despite the abundant vehicle traffic and human activity surrounding the natural resource extraction sites outside of Douglas, Wyo., wildlife like pronghorn antelope were easy to see at all times of the day. Antelope are seen grazing in the sagebrush on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train travels north of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. Natural resources help to drive a major portion of the rural West's regional economies. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A coal train travels north of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. Natural resources help to drive a major portion of the rural West's regional economies. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Angelica at home with her daughter in O'Neill, Nebraska on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
Angelica at home with her daughter in O'Neill, Nebraska on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
 Senior Stephanie Gonzales, 17, has been living with her best friend's family in recent weeks in an effort to maintain her rigorous school and extracurricular activity schedules. Gonzales' mother is currently being held after having been arrested during the immigration raid that took dozens of community members away from their jobs and their families. Gonzales is seen here at O'Neill High School in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
Senior Stephanie Gonzales, 17, has been living with her best friend's family in recent weeks in an effort to maintain her rigorous school and extracurricular activity schedules. Gonzales' mother is currently being held after having been arrested during the immigration raid that took dozens of community members away from their jobs and their families. Gonzales is seen here at O'Neill High School in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
 The O'Neill Ventures tomato plant is seen here on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 in O'Neill, Nebraska. In August, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested dozens of employees at the tomato greenhouse, sending a wave of change through the small rural community.
The O'Neill Ventures tomato plant is seen here on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 in O'Neill, Nebraska. In August, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested dozens of employees at the tomato greenhouse, sending a wave of change through the small rural community.
 A view of downtown O'Neill, Nebraska, as seen on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
A view of downtown O'Neill, Nebraska, as seen on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
 A view of downtown O'Neill, Nebraska, as seen on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
A view of downtown O'Neill, Nebraska, as seen on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
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MERRILLFARMSChores around the farm vary from day to day, but on this particular day one of Bob's chores included moving the large irrigation sprinkler in the alfalfa field so it would be out of the way for cutting in the coming days. The sprinkler movement is controlled by a large motor. Bob is seen here at the field outside of Parker, South Dakota on May 23, 2018.
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MERRILLFARMSBob Merrill's father began farming in Parker, South Dakota in 1968. Bob's grandson Shane Merrill joined the family operation in 2011. Bob poses with his 1960s tractor at the family's farm on Wednesday, May 23, 2018.
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MERRILLFARMSDairy cattle are seen on the Merrill family farm in Parker, South Dakota on Wednesday, May 23, 2018.
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MERRILLFARMSFrom left to right, Allen Merrill, Shane Merrill and Bob Merrill represent three of the four generations of farmers that have operated the family's farm and dairy business in Parker, South Dakota, as seen here on May 23, 2018.
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MERRILLFARMSA barn on the southeast edge of town in Parker, South Dakota, as seen on Wednesday, May 23, 2018.
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MERRILLFARMSShane Merrill walks to his tractor to disc a field in preparation for planting while working on the family farm outside Parker, South Dakota on May 23, 2018. Discing is a process that tills the soil before seeds will be planted. Remnants of last year's corn crop are still visible in the field.
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MERRILLFARMSA view of Main Avenue in downtown Parker, South Dakota, as seen on Wednesday, May 23, 2018.
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 Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams, center, campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams, center, campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of a community bulletin board on display at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in Ekalaka, Montana. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of a community bulletin board on display at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in Ekalaka, Montana. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Montana Highway 7 just north of Ekalaka, Montana. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Montana Highway 7 just north of Ekalaka, Montana. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A play set is seen in a yard in Ekalaka on Sunday morning. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A play set is seen in a yard in Ekalaka on Sunday morning. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Items for sale on display in the dining area of the Wagon Wheel Cafe. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Items for sale on display in the dining area of the Wagon Wheel Cafe. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Ekalaka's Main Street on Sunday morning. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Ekalaka's Main Street on Sunday morning. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 The Wyoming Girls School is set just beyond the center of town, adjacent to the town's small airport runway and neighboring housing developments. Campus is seen here on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Sheridan, Wyo. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
The Wyoming Girls School is set just beyond the center of town, adjacent to the town's small airport runway and neighboring housing developments. Campus is seen here on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Sheridan, Wyo. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Bridget, age 16, grade 10, right, stretches out on an exercise ball during science class while fellow student Nicole, age 17, grade 12, second from right, looks on at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Students are encouraged to sit where they feel comfortable, and often times that may mean sitting on a desk, on the floor or on an exercise ball. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Bridget, age 16, grade 10, right, stretches out on an exercise ball during science class while fellow student Nicole, age 17, grade 12, second from right, looks on at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Students are encouraged to sit where they feel comfortable, and often times that may mean sitting on a desk, on the floor or on an exercise ball. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students Madison, age 18, who has completed her HiSET, left, and graduate Marisa, age 17, take a break to have their lunch after cooking for students and staff at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Students Madison, age 18, who has completed her HiSET, left, and graduate Marisa, age 17, take a break to have their lunch after cooking for students and staff at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students and teachers play a game of hockey at the Whitney Rink at the M&M's Center in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. The Wyoming Girls School rents ice time from the center so students are able to participate in a sport that couldn't otherwise be done on campus. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Students and teachers play a game of hockey at the Whitney Rink at the M&M's Center in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. The Wyoming Girls School rents ice time from the center so students are able to participate in a sport that couldn't otherwise be done on campus. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Student artwork hangs in a hallway at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Student artwork hangs in a hallway at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students Atheina, age 17, grade 11, left, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, practice memorizing a class speech during class at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. During class, students are often seen with items like fidget spinners, modeling clay, or even moon sand and plush toys as pictured here. Engaging with these items while working in class has shown to help students stay focused on their tasks. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Students Atheina, age 17, grade 11, left, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, practice memorizing a class speech during class at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. During class, students are often seen with items like fidget spinners, modeling clay, or even moon sand and plush toys as pictured here. Engaging with these items while working in class has shown to help students stay focused on their tasks. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 A student's locker is decorated with their sobriety tokens, a reminder of the trauma and challenges some of the students at the Wyoming Girls School have faced and are working to overcome during their stay at the school. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
A student's locker is decorated with their sobriety tokens, a reminder of the trauma and challenges some of the students at the Wyoming Girls School have faced and are working to overcome during their stay at the school. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 A view of campus as seen from principal Dixie Cooper's office window at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
A view of campus as seen from principal Dixie Cooper's office window at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Student Willow, age 18, is seen here in the living room area of her dorm's common space at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Willow has completed her HiSET, or high school equivalency diploma. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Student Willow, age 18, is seen here in the living room area of her dorm's common space at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Willow has completed her HiSET, or high school equivalency diploma. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 From left, students Shantell, age 18, working toward HiSET, Lacey, age 16, grade 10, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, follow along during a guided tapping class, a form of guided mindfulness, at a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
From left, students Shantell, age 18, working toward HiSET, Lacey, age 16, grade 10, and Luxxus, age 16, grade 12, follow along during a guided tapping class, a form of guided mindfulness, at a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Paraprofessional Kim Wenger is seen waiting in the hallway outside the restroom waiting for a student at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Students are escorted nearly everywhere around the school, including to and from the restroom and the various campus buildings. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Paraprofessional Kim Wenger is seen waiting in the hallway outside the restroom waiting for a student at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Students are escorted nearly everywhere around the school, including to and from the restroom and the various campus buildings. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students practice good and bad handshake techniques while talking about applying for jobs during an independent living course at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Students practice good and bad handshake techniques while talking about applying for jobs during an independent living course at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Principal Dixie Cooper, center, visits with students Emily, age 15, grade 8, sitting left, and Kaitlyn, age 15, grade 9, sitting right, during lunch at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Principal Dixie Cooper, center, visits with students Emily, age 15, grade 8, sitting left, and Kaitlyn, age 15, grade 9, sitting right, during lunch at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students in biology class transfer plants for planting this spring in the on-campus greenhouse garden at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Students in biology class transfer plants for planting this spring in the on-campus greenhouse garden at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Student Dominique, grade 10, is seen here inside her dorm room at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Dominique will be leaving the school in May. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Student Dominique, grade 10, is seen here inside her dorm room at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Dominique will be leaving the school in May. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students are escorted to and from all buildings around campus, as seen here at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Students are escorted to and from all buildings around campus, as seen here at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Student Aeriel, age 17, working towards HiSET, talks with family on the phone from a common area in a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Student Aeriel, age 17, working towards HiSET, talks with family on the phone from a common area in a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 From left, students Willow, age 18, graduate Bailey, age 18,  technology and psychology teacher Michelle Nielsen, and student graduate Addie, age 18, take photos of each other to explore works of art on the Google Arts and Culture Face Match during technology class at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
From left, students Willow, age 18, graduate Bailey, age 18, technology and psychology teacher Michelle Nielsen, and student graduate Addie, age 18, take photos of each other to explore works of art on the Google Arts and Culture Face Match during technology class at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 From let, intern therapist Kelly Johnson, student Latavia, age 16, grade 10m youth service specialist Megan Peak, student Emily, age 15, grade 8, and student graduate Marisa, age 17, gather together for art therapy in a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
From let, intern therapist Kelly Johnson, student Latavia, age 16, grade 10m youth service specialist Megan Peak, student Emily, age 15, grade 8, and student graduate Marisa, age 17, gather together for art therapy in a dorm at the Wyoming Girls School in Sheridan, Wyo. on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 The Wyoming Girls School is set just beyond the center of town, adjacent to the town's small airport runway and neighboring housing developments. Campus is seen here on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Sheridan, Wyo. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
The Wyoming Girls School is set just beyond the center of town, adjacent to the town's small airport runway and neighboring housing developments. Campus is seen here on Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018 in Sheridan, Wyo. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. A view from the top of the elevator shows downtown Rapid City and a city park, as seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. A view from the top of the elevator shows downtown Rapid City and a city park, as seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. The property is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. The property is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan gets ready in his dressing room before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan gets ready in his dressing room before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 The cast takes the stage during a performance of the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
The cast takes the stage during a performance of the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 The cast of the Medora Musical during a recent performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
The cast of the Medora Musical during a recent performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Magnets on display in the Medora Musical theatre gift shop. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Magnets on display in the Medora Musical theatre gift shop. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan tunes his guitar backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Host "Cowboy Chet" Chet Wollan tunes his guitar backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 As the show wraps, a final rider climbs with a horse to the top of the bluff behind the Medora Musical stage. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
As the show wraps, a final rider climbs with a horse to the top of the bluff behind the Medora Musical stage. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan waves to a tour group backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan waves to a tour group backstage before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 (from left) Albert Diem, 12, Carter Ehlis, 13, Morgan Ehlis, 15, Phoebe Diem, 15, and Sunshine Diem, 14, all from Dickinson, N.D., visit during intermission at the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
(from left) Albert Diem, 12, Carter Ehlis, 13, Morgan Ehlis, 15, Phoebe Diem, 15, and Sunshine Diem, 14, all from Dickinson, N.D., visit during intermission at the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Elk on the bluff behind the Medora Musical theatre stage signal the beginning of the show, with guests beginning to take their seats as the crew finishes final prep. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Elk on the bluff behind the Medora Musical theatre stage signal the beginning of the show, with guests beginning to take their seats as the crew finishes final prep. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Audience members visit with cast members following the performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Audience members visit with cast members following the performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Sloane Heersche, 3, left, and sister Aeris Heersche, 5, both of Chicago, get a closer look at the stage during intermission. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Sloane Heersche, 3, left, and sister Aeris Heersche, 5, both of Chicago, get a closer look at the stage during intermission. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kally Wagner, 14, center, Nizhoni Lawton, 11, and Haesha Charette, 12, right, have a snack in the shade while riding horses in Crow Agency, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Kally Wagner, 14, center, Nizhoni Lawton, 11, and Haesha Charette, 12, right, have a snack in the shade while riding horses in Crow Agency, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rural roads, open prairie and rolling hills weave together the sparsely populated area near Decker, Montana, home to several coal mining operations. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Rural roads, open prairie and rolling hills weave together the sparsely populated area near Decker, Montana, home to several coal mining operations. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of the computer lab at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
A view of the computer lab at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Biology teacher Katie Montez, standing, works with students on a lesson during class at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Biology teacher Katie Montez, standing, works with students on a lesson during class at Red Cloud Indian School high school on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Signage marks the entrance of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation south of Scenic, South Dakota. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Thunder Valley Workforce Development crew members gather to discuss the day's objectives and progress on the sustainable community being built on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Thunder Valley Workforce Development crew members gather to discuss the day's objectives and progress on the sustainable community being built on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. With youth and the spiritual and cultural identity of Native families as the foundation for their goals, Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation is working to build spaces, programs, and communities that will greatly impact the socioeconomic condition of Native people living on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
 Red Cloud High School student Jacob Rosales is celebrated for his academic achievements that are providing him with post-high school educational opportunities. Rosales is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
Red Cloud High School student Jacob Rosales is celebrated for his academic achievements that are providing him with post-high school educational opportunities. Rosales is pictured here at Red Cloud Indian School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. A view of Red Cloud Indian School campus on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The Holy Rosary Mission was founded in the late 1800s by Jesuits leading a religious mission, building the campus that would later become facilities for the early beginnings of Red Cloud Indian School. The Catholic educational institution is now run in cooperation with the local Lakota people and Jesuits, relying almost entirely on donations and grant funding to keep the facility running. The high school has some the highest graduation rates on the reservation. (Photo by Kristina Barker)
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