051517-SiouxFalls017A.JPG
040917-TrapperCabin001A.JPG
 Cars are parked at dusk at Motel Rapid on Sturgis Road, or a portion of the Interstate 90 business loop, in Rapid city
 The Rolling Rez bus is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Martin, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. First Peoples Fund has partnered with several organizations to fund a bus that travels the reservation for scheduled stops throughout the year, providing a place for artists to bring their work and sell to one of the reservation's cultural museums, The Heritage Center at Red Cloud Indian School. Without Rolling Rez, some artists would not have access to an art buyer or would be unable to travel the far distance to Red Cloud due to the remote, rural nature of the reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 National Players actors take the state to a sold-out crowd for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A roadside art stand near the site of the Wounded Knee Massacre is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. During the summer tourism months, local artists are often seen at these types of road side stands. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Artist Dick Termes with his spherical paintings at his studio, Termesphere Gallery, on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Termes first became involved with the National Endowment for the Arts in the early 1970s. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 National Players actors Shawn Morgenlander, left, Claire Allegra Taylor, center, and Allyson Boate, right, get ready for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 Brad McGlothlin, 38, is a dragline operator at the North Antelope Rochelle coal mine south of Gillette, Wyoming. McGlothlin weas laid off from his position as part of hundreds of layoffs effecting Peabody Energy employees, but he was hired back after three months. �All I want to do is go to work, be left alone, and pay my taxes. I don�t need a government ruling my life,� he explains about what he wants from those in power. �I voted for Donald Trump and I�m very optimistic.� Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 Pizza Carrello owners Rachel Kalenberg, 35, left, and Ariane Jimison, 38, center, make cheesecakes on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. "We can probably do more in the belly of the beast," Jimison says about why they have chosen to keep expanding their business, workforce, and community involvement in Gillette. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 A flag waves over the city of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at Overlook Park on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 A view of the Eagle Butte coal mine north of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 Mayor Louise Carter-King is seen here in her office at City Hall in Gillette, Wyoming, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2016. In 2015, Carter-King became the city's first female mayor. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 A view of the Wyodak power plant in Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at dusk on Monday evening, Jan. 23, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
 Sioux Falls photographer Rich Osness, left, photographs 4-month-old KeShawn Cox, Jr. at the All Stop gas station and grocery store in Rosebud, South Dakota. Eighteen-year-old parents Tameqah, second from right, and KeShawn Cox have had their own troubles with Indian Health Services when they brought their newborn son in to have jaundice looked at and a hospital staff had mixed up the young patient's files and misidentified him as having pneumonia. The mistake was quickly correced, but left KeShawn Cox feeling like IHS could do a lot to be more organized.
 A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
 Graffiti and art on an old church in Parmalee, South Dakota.
 Stacey Alkire, of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, currently living in Denver, has been at the Seven Councils Camp for five weeks. Alkire said she was compelled to support her relatives at the camp "because I'm tired of the govermenting screwing the Natives. They don't create balance with us." She continues, "All we want them to do is honor our treaties. I know this is a poverty-stricken place. But this is a beautiful place. We've never been honored. We've never been respected." Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Morton County Sheriff Deputy Jon Moll visits with police officers from the Fargo Police Department while stopped along North Dakota Highway 1806. Protesters rode on horseback from the Seven Councils Camp along rural county roads as a form of protest again the Dakota Access Pipeline. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
051517-SiouxFalls017A.JPG
040917-TrapperCabin001A.JPG
 Cars are parked at dusk at Motel Rapid on Sturgis Road, or a portion of the Interstate 90 business loop, in Rapid city
Cars are parked at dusk at Motel Rapid on Sturgis Road, or a portion of the Interstate 90 business loop, in Rapid city
 The Rolling Rez bus is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Martin, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. First Peoples Fund has partnered with several organizations to fund a bus that travels the reservation for scheduled stops throughout the year, providing a place for artists to bring their work and sell to one of the reservation's cultural museums, The Heritage Center at Red Cloud Indian School. Without Rolling Rez, some artists would not have access to an art buyer or would be unable to travel the far distance to Red Cloud due to the remote, rural nature of the reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The Rolling Rez bus is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Martin, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. First Peoples Fund has partnered with several organizations to fund a bus that travels the reservation for scheduled stops throughout the year, providing a place for artists to bring their work and sell to one of the reservation's cultural museums, The Heritage Center at Red Cloud Indian School. Without Rolling Rez, some artists would not have access to an art buyer or would be unable to travel the far distance to Red Cloud due to the remote, rural nature of the reservation. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 National Players actors take the state to a sold-out crowd for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
National Players actors take the state to a sold-out crowd for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A roadside art stand near the site of the Wounded Knee Massacre is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. During the summer tourism months, local artists are often seen at these types of road side stands. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A roadside art stand near the site of the Wounded Knee Massacre is seen here on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Wounded Knee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. During the summer tourism months, local artists are often seen at these types of road side stands. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Artist Dick Termes with his spherical paintings at his studio, Termesphere Gallery, on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Termes first became involved with the National Endowment for the Arts in the early 1970s. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Artist Dick Termes with his spherical paintings at his studio, Termesphere Gallery, on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Termes first became involved with the National Endowment for the Arts in the early 1970s. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 National Players actors Shawn Morgenlander, left, Claire Allegra Taylor, center, and Allyson Boate, right, get ready for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
National Players actors Shawn Morgenlander, left, Claire Allegra Taylor, center, and Allyson Boate, right, get ready for the evening's performance of "Hamlet" on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, in Spearfish, South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 Brad McGlothlin, 38, is a dragline operator at the North Antelope Rochelle coal mine south of Gillette, Wyoming. McGlothlin weas laid off from his position as part of hundreds of layoffs effecting Peabody Energy employees, but he was hired back after three months. �All I want to do is go to work, be left alone, and pay my taxes. I don�t need a government ruling my life,� he explains about what he wants from those in power. �I voted for Donald Trump and I�m very optimistic.� Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Brad McGlothlin, 38, is a dragline operator at the North Antelope Rochelle coal mine south of Gillette, Wyoming. McGlothlin weas laid off from his position as part of hundreds of layoffs effecting Peabody Energy employees, but he was hired back after three months. �All I want to do is go to work, be left alone, and pay my taxes. I don�t need a government ruling my life,� he explains about what he wants from those in power. �I voted for Donald Trump and I�m very optimistic.� Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 Pizza Carrello owners Rachel Kalenberg, 35, left, and Ariane Jimison, 38, center, make cheesecakes on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. "We can probably do more in the belly of the beast," Jimison says about why they have chosen to keep expanding their business, workforce, and community involvement in Gillette. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Pizza Carrello owners Rachel Kalenberg, 35, left, and Ariane Jimison, 38, center, make cheesecakes on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. "We can probably do more in the belly of the beast," Jimison says about why they have chosen to keep expanding their business, workforce, and community involvement in Gillette. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 A flag waves over the city of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at Overlook Park on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
A flag waves over the city of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at Overlook Park on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 A view of the Eagle Butte coal mine north of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
A view of the Eagle Butte coal mine north of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 Mayor Louise Carter-King is seen here in her office at City Hall in Gillette, Wyoming, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2016. In 2015, Carter-King became the city's first female mayor. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Mayor Louise Carter-King is seen here in her office at City Hall in Gillette, Wyoming, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2016. In 2015, Carter-King became the city's first female mayor. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 A view of the Wyodak power plant in Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at dusk on Monday evening, Jan. 23, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
A view of the Wyodak power plant in Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at dusk on Monday evening, Jan. 23, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
 Sioux Falls photographer Rich Osness, left, photographs 4-month-old KeShawn Cox, Jr. at the All Stop gas station and grocery store in Rosebud, South Dakota. Eighteen-year-old parents Tameqah, second from right, and KeShawn Cox have had their own troubles with Indian Health Services when they brought their newborn son in to have jaundice looked at and a hospital staff had mixed up the young patient's files and misidentified him as having pneumonia. The mistake was quickly correced, but left KeShawn Cox feeling like IHS could do a lot to be more organized.
Sioux Falls photographer Rich Osness, left, photographs 4-month-old KeShawn Cox, Jr. at the All Stop gas station and grocery store in Rosebud, South Dakota. Eighteen-year-old parents Tameqah, second from right, and KeShawn Cox have had their own troubles with Indian Health Services when they brought their newborn son in to have jaundice looked at and a hospital staff had mixed up the young patient's files and misidentified him as having pneumonia. The mistake was quickly correced, but left KeShawn Cox feeling like IHS could do a lot to be more organized.
 A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
 Graffiti and art on an old church in Parmalee, South Dakota.
Graffiti and art on an old church in Parmalee, South Dakota.
 Stacey Alkire, of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, currently living in Denver, has been at the Seven Councils Camp for five weeks. Alkire said she was compelled to support her relatives at the camp "because I'm tired of the govermenting screwing the Natives. They don't create balance with us." She continues, "All we want them to do is honor our treaties. I know this is a poverty-stricken place. But this is a beautiful place. We've never been honored. We've never been respected." Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Stacey Alkire, of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, currently living in Denver, has been at the Seven Councils Camp for five weeks. Alkire said she was compelled to support her relatives at the camp "because I'm tired of the govermenting screwing the Natives. They don't create balance with us." She continues, "All we want them to do is honor our treaties. I know this is a poverty-stricken place. But this is a beautiful place. We've never been honored. We've never been respected." Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Morton County Sheriff Deputy Jon Moll visits with police officers from the Fargo Police Department while stopped along North Dakota Highway 1806. Protesters rode on horseback from the Seven Councils Camp along rural county roads as a form of protest again the Dakota Access Pipeline. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Morton County Sheriff Deputy Jon Moll visits with police officers from the Fargo Police Department while stopped along North Dakota Highway 1806. Protesters rode on horseback from the Seven Councils Camp along rural county roads as a form of protest again the Dakota Access Pipeline. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
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