Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 Brad McGlothlin, 38, is a dragline operator at the North Antelope Rochelle coal mine south of Gillette, Wyoming. McGlothlin weas laid off from his position as part of hundreds of layoffs effecting Peabody Energy employees, but he was hired back after three months. �All I want to do is go to work, be left alone, and pay my taxes. I don�t need a government ruling my life,� he explains about what he wants from those in power. �I voted for Donald Trump and I�m very optimistic.� Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 Pizza Carrello owners Rachel Kalenberg, 35, left, and Ariane Jimison, 38, center, make cheesecakes on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. "We can probably do more in the belly of the beast," Jimison says about why they have chosen to keep expanding their business, workforce, and community involvement in Gillette. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 A flag waves over the city of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at Overlook Park on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 A view of the Eagle Butte coal mine north of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 Mayor Louise Carter-King is seen here in her office at City Hall in Gillette, Wyoming, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2016. In 2015, Carter-King became the city's first female mayor. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 A view of the Wyodak power plant in Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at dusk on Monday evening, Jan. 23, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
 Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
 A view of an ambulance as seen through a car windshield on BIA Road 1 on the Rosebud Indian Reservation.
 Sioux Falls photographer Rich Osness, left, photographs 4-month-old KeShawn Cox, Jr. at the All Stop gas station and grocery store in Rosebud, South Dakota. Eighteen-year-old parents Tameqah, second from right, and KeShawn Cox have had their own troubles with Indian Health Services when they brought their newborn son in to have jaundice looked at and a hospital staff had mixed up the young patient's files and misidentified him as having pneumonia. The mistake was quickly correced, but left KeShawn Cox feeling like IHS could do a lot to be more organized.
 A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
 Horses are seen through a barbed wire fence on the Rosebud Indian Reservation.
 Oliver Semans is a Rosebud Sioux Tribe Health Committee member, retired law enforcement officer and co-director of Four Direcitons, a voter engagement organization. Semans is seen here at a cemetery overlooking Rosebud.
 Graffiti and art on an old church in Parmalee, South Dakota.
 A horse stands on a bluff at the edge of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation along Highway 44 in South Dakota.
 Stacey Alkire, of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, currently living in Denver, has been at the Seven Councils Camp for five weeks. Alkire said she was compelled to support her relatives at the camp "because I'm tired of the govermenting screwing the Natives. They don't create balance with us." She continues, "All we want them to do is honor our treaties. I know this is a poverty-stricken place. But this is a beautiful place. We've never been honored. We've never been respected." Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Morton County Sheriff Deputy Jon Moll visits with police officers from the Fargo Police Department while stopped along North Dakota Highway 1806. Protesters rode on horseback from the Seven Councils Camp along rural county roads as a form of protest again the Dakota Access Pipeline. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Protesters rode on horseback from the Seven Councils Camp along rural county roads as a form of protest again the Dakota Access Pipeline. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Allen Siegfried, of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, had been staying in a tipi at the Seven Councils Camp until a couple from Georgia needed a place to stay. Siegfried gave the couple his campsite to use during their stay and he spends the nights at home. "This is making history," he explains about people from all over the country and all over the world coming together to show support for the protestors. "Seeing the unity no matter where you come from," he explains. "That's what it's all about. We're all just one." Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Indiana University students Jack Ventura-Cruess, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe resident Allen Siegfried, and Atlanta, Georgia resident identifing himself as Big Heed visit around the campfire after dusk at the Seven Councils Camp near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney is seen Saturday morning, Oct. 8, 2016 at the Morton County Law Enforcement Center in Mandan, North Dakota. Sheriff Laney explains how some law enforcement personnel have removed their name badges from their uniforms as to protect themselves and their families from threats or harm. Sheriff Paul says law enforcement takes the threats and intimidation from Dakota Access Pipeline protestors seriously. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 A view of the Dakota Access Pipeline progress is seen on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016 on Morton County Road 82 west of St. Anthony, an unincorporated community in Morton County. A portion of the pipe was being set into a trench in the ground. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Recluse Road gives views of the expansive rolling prairie surrounding Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 Brad McGlothlin, 38, is a dragline operator at the North Antelope Rochelle coal mine south of Gillette, Wyoming. McGlothlin weas laid off from his position as part of hundreds of layoffs effecting Peabody Energy employees, but he was hired back after three months. �All I want to do is go to work, be left alone, and pay my taxes. I don�t need a government ruling my life,� he explains about what he wants from those in power. �I voted for Donald Trump and I�m very optimistic.� Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Brad McGlothlin, 38, is a dragline operator at the North Antelope Rochelle coal mine south of Gillette, Wyoming. McGlothlin weas laid off from his position as part of hundreds of layoffs effecting Peabody Energy employees, but he was hired back after three months. �All I want to do is go to work, be left alone, and pay my taxes. I don�t need a government ruling my life,� he explains about what he wants from those in power. �I voted for Donald Trump and I�m very optimistic.� Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 Pizza Carrello owners Rachel Kalenberg, 35, left, and Ariane Jimison, 38, center, make cheesecakes on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. "We can probably do more in the belly of the beast," Jimison says about why they have chosen to keep expanding their business, workforce, and community involvement in Gillette. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Pizza Carrello owners Rachel Kalenberg, 35, left, and Ariane Jimison, 38, center, make cheesecakes on Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. "We can probably do more in the belly of the beast," Jimison says about why they have chosen to keep expanding their business, workforce, and community involvement in Gillette. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 A flag waves over the city of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at Overlook Park on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
A flag waves over the city of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at Overlook Park on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 A view of the Eagle Butte coal mine north of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
A view of the Eagle Butte coal mine north of Gillette, Wyoming, as seen on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 Mayor Louise Carter-King is seen here in her office at City Hall in Gillette, Wyoming, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2016. In 2015, Carter-King became the city's first female mayor. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
Mayor Louise Carter-King is seen here in her office at City Hall in Gillette, Wyoming, on Monday, Jan. 23, 2016. In 2015, Carter-King became the city's first female mayor. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 A view of the Wyodak power plant in Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at dusk on Monday evening, Jan. 23, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. 

CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal

GILLETTE
A view of the Wyodak power plant in Gillette, Wyoming, as seen at dusk on Monday evening, Jan. 23, 2017. Many residents in Gillette, Wyoming, express a sense of hope following the November election. The region's big job providers, dependent largely on coal, oil and natural gas extraction, have faced recent layoffs, bankruptcy and economic decline. For conservative voters in the state, President Donald Trump has given them hope that their pleas for help may finally be heard. Should President Trump's administration lessen environmental regulations and push for more domestic jobs to be created, the industries that have been struggling in Wyoming could once again thive. CREDIT: Kristina Barker for The Wall Street Journal GILLETTE
 Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
Kathy Boyd is seen here at her home in the Grass Mountain community on the Rosebud Indian Reservation. It took nearly four hours for Boyd's health to be assessed, care to be determined, and life flight to be approved before she was transfered nearly 200 miles east to a hospital in Rapid City.
 A view of an ambulance as seen through a car windshield on BIA Road 1 on the Rosebud Indian Reservation.
A view of an ambulance as seen through a car windshield on BIA Road 1 on the Rosebud Indian Reservation.
 Sioux Falls photographer Rich Osness, left, photographs 4-month-old KeShawn Cox, Jr. at the All Stop gas station and grocery store in Rosebud, South Dakota. Eighteen-year-old parents Tameqah, second from right, and KeShawn Cox have had their own troubles with Indian Health Services when they brought their newborn son in to have jaundice looked at and a hospital staff had mixed up the young patient's files and misidentified him as having pneumonia. The mistake was quickly correced, but left KeShawn Cox feeling like IHS could do a lot to be more organized.
Sioux Falls photographer Rich Osness, left, photographs 4-month-old KeShawn Cox, Jr. at the All Stop gas station and grocery store in Rosebud, South Dakota. Eighteen-year-old parents Tameqah, second from right, and KeShawn Cox have had their own troubles with Indian Health Services when they brought their newborn son in to have jaundice looked at and a hospital staff had mixed up the young patient's files and misidentified him as having pneumonia. The mistake was quickly correced, but left KeShawn Cox feeling like IHS could do a lot to be more organized.
 A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
 Horses are seen through a barbed wire fence on the Rosebud Indian Reservation.
Horses are seen through a barbed wire fence on the Rosebud Indian Reservation.
 Oliver Semans is a Rosebud Sioux Tribe Health Committee member, retired law enforcement officer and co-director of Four Direcitons, a voter engagement organization. Semans is seen here at a cemetery overlooking Rosebud.
Oliver Semans is a Rosebud Sioux Tribe Health Committee member, retired law enforcement officer and co-director of Four Direcitons, a voter engagement organization. Semans is seen here at a cemetery overlooking Rosebud.
 Graffiti and art on an old church in Parmalee, South Dakota.
Graffiti and art on an old church in Parmalee, South Dakota.
 A horse stands on a bluff at the edge of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation along Highway 44 in South Dakota.
A horse stands on a bluff at the edge of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation along Highway 44 in South Dakota.
 Stacey Alkire, of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, currently living in Denver, has been at the Seven Councils Camp for five weeks. Alkire said she was compelled to support her relatives at the camp "because I'm tired of the govermenting screwing the Natives. They don't create balance with us." She continues, "All we want them to do is honor our treaties. I know this is a poverty-stricken place. But this is a beautiful place. We've never been honored. We've never been respected." Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Stacey Alkire, of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, currently living in Denver, has been at the Seven Councils Camp for five weeks. Alkire said she was compelled to support her relatives at the camp "because I'm tired of the govermenting screwing the Natives. They don't create balance with us." She continues, "All we want them to do is honor our treaties. I know this is a poverty-stricken place. But this is a beautiful place. We've never been honored. We've never been respected." Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Morton County Sheriff Deputy Jon Moll visits with police officers from the Fargo Police Department while stopped along North Dakota Highway 1806. Protesters rode on horseback from the Seven Councils Camp along rural county roads as a form of protest again the Dakota Access Pipeline. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Morton County Sheriff Deputy Jon Moll visits with police officers from the Fargo Police Department while stopped along North Dakota Highway 1806. Protesters rode on horseback from the Seven Councils Camp along rural county roads as a form of protest again the Dakota Access Pipeline. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
A long exposure shows the movement of activity at the Seven Councils Camp just after dusk on Saturday evening, Oct. 8, 2016. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Protesters rode on horseback from the Seven Councils Camp along rural county roads as a form of protest again the Dakota Access Pipeline. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Protesters rode on horseback from the Seven Councils Camp along rural county roads as a form of protest again the Dakota Access Pipeline. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Allen Siegfried, of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, had been staying in a tipi at the Seven Councils Camp until a couple from Georgia needed a place to stay. Siegfried gave the couple his campsite to use during their stay and he spends the nights at home. "This is making history," he explains about people from all over the country and all over the world coming together to show support for the protestors. "Seeing the unity no matter where you come from," he explains. "That's what it's all about. We're all just one." Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Allen Siegfried, of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, had been staying in a tipi at the Seven Councils Camp until a couple from Georgia needed a place to stay. Siegfried gave the couple his campsite to use during their stay and he spends the nights at home. "This is making history," he explains about people from all over the country and all over the world coming together to show support for the protestors. "Seeing the unity no matter where you come from," he explains. "That's what it's all about. We're all just one." Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Indiana University students Jack Ventura-Cruess, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe resident Allen Siegfried, and Atlanta, Georgia resident identifing himself as Big Heed visit around the campfire after dusk at the Seven Councils Camp near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Indiana University students Jack Ventura-Cruess, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe resident Allen Siegfried, and Atlanta, Georgia resident identifing himself as Big Heed visit around the campfire after dusk at the Seven Councils Camp near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney is seen Saturday morning, Oct. 8, 2016 at the Morton County Law Enforcement Center in Mandan, North Dakota. Sheriff Laney explains how some law enforcement personnel have removed their name badges from their uniforms as to protect themselves and their families from threats or harm. Sheriff Paul says law enforcement takes the threats and intimidation from Dakota Access Pipeline protestors seriously. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
Cass County Sheriff Paul Laney is seen Saturday morning, Oct. 8, 2016 at the Morton County Law Enforcement Center in Mandan, North Dakota. Sheriff Laney explains how some law enforcement personnel have removed their name badges from their uniforms as to protect themselves and their families from threats or harm. Sheriff Paul says law enforcement takes the threats and intimidation from Dakota Access Pipeline protestors seriously. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 A view of the Dakota Access Pipeline progress is seen on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016 on Morton County Road 82 west of St. Anthony, an unincorporated community in Morton County. A portion of the pipe was being set into a trench in the ground. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
A view of the Dakota Access Pipeline progress is seen on Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016 on Morton County Road 82 west of St. Anthony, an unincorporated community in Morton County. A portion of the pipe was being set into a trench in the ground. Saturday marked the 60th day of protest encampments surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Law enforcement has reached out to federal agencies for both monetary and personnel assistance. Tensions have flared in recent weeks between law enforcement and protestors, as well as between private security and protestors. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
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