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 Cattle at Cody and Deanna Sand�s ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. The Sands practice holistic grazing versus the traditional grazing most of the world�s ranchers follow. The holistic ranching has increased grass production and greatly impacted the Sands� quality of life for the better, including eliminating their financial debt, freeing up time normally spent working, and drastically changed the ecosystem of the land they operate on. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
 Dawn at the Sands� ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
 Cody Sand and his wife Deanna graze their cattle following holistic ranching practices to work with the native grasslands of North Dakota. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
 Dawn at the Sands� ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
 Cattle at Cody and Deanna Sand�s ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. The Sands practice holistic grazing versus the traditional grazing most of the world�s ranchers follow. The holistic ranching has increased grass production and greatly impacted the Sands� quality of life for the better, including eliminating their financial debt, freeing up time normally spent working, and drastically changed the ecosystem of the land they operate on. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
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 A view of Henry Red Cloud's property in the Wakpamni District on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, as seen on Friday, March 22, 2019. Red Cloud and his family escaped the flooding at their home which remains just above water but their solar power education businesses is all partially submerged. Red Cloud said this was their ninth day away from their home following a blizzard and subsequent flooding. Henry Red Cloud surveys the damage. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Wounded Knee District Secretary Babette Thin Elk has been working tirelessly to answer phones and coordinate supplies and care for area residents stranded by floodwaters. Thin Elk worked out of an office at the Wounded Knee Cap Office on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation on Friday, March 22, 2019. Some of her calls included pleas to help an 84-year-old grandmother and a newborn. Between two homes, there were 8 people needing aid. "We know people are panicked and claustrophobic. We are doing what we can." (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the flooded highway that connects the villages of Wounded Knee and Manderson on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, as seen on March, 22, 2019. The highway has been closed due to runoff from a recent blizzard causing drainage to run over the road. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 David Gibbons, left, and Shane Mesteth ride out a rutted out muddy road to the highway to gather food, water and medical supplies to deliver to a nearby resident north of Manderson on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Wounded Knee District Representative Garfield Steele talks about efforts being made in his district to assist residents that have been stranded without food, water or medicine due to flooding on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Steele is seen here at the Wounded Knee Cap Office on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Day laborers and volunteers unload a truck of non-perishable foods from the Food Distribution Program's emergency delivery in Oglala on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 David Gibbons, left, and Shane Mesteth ride out a rutted out muddy road to the highway to gather food, water and medical supplies to deliver to a nearby resident north of Manderson on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Blowing snow creates hazardous driving conditions during on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019 south of Mobridge, South Dakota. With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Horses shield themselves from the blowing snow in Mobridge, South Dakota on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center prompted the move of about 5 dozen residents to area facilities across western South Dakota. Hazardous driving conditions has made winter travel difficult for community residents to be able to leave town and visit loved ones in other facilities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The Mo-Rest Motel in Mobridge, South Dakota is seen here on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. The rural South Dakota town along the Missouri River is a hub for regional residents. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center prompted the move of about 5 dozen residents to area facilities across western South Dakota. Hazardous driving conditions has made winter travel difficult for community residents to be able to leave town and visit loved ones in other facilities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Peg Waddell, 78, left, Catherine Spiry, 75, second from left, Betty Swanson, 80, and Don Waddell, 78, play a game of pinochle at the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. While playing cards, everyone in the group explained how many family members and friends they have had in the care facility throughout the decades of operation in the community. "I hope they have one when I need it," Betty Swanson said about the lack of services for aging residents needing specialized care in Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view inside the Mobridge Senior Citizens Center on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center has affected nearly every resident in the rural community along the Missouri River. The care facility housed hundreds of residents over several decades, making it difficult to find someone in town that hasn't been tied to the facility at one point or another. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Blowing snow creates hazardous driving conditions during on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019 south of Mobridge, South Dakota. With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Barb Opie, 76, husband Don Opie was recently moved from the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center to over 2 hours away at a nursing in Redfield, South Dakota. Because of the far distance, Opie is only able to travel to see her husband every other weekend. When her husband was at the nursing home in Mobridge, Opie would see her husband every day after she got done at work. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Ramona Labrensz, 87, is seen here with a photo of her late husband Harold at her home in Mobridge, South Dakota on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. Labrensz's husband Harold recently passed away just a few days after being moved from the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center to a nursing facility in New Rockford, North Dakota. With her local facility closing and he husband about to be nearly 4 hours away, Labrensz had rented an efficiency apartment close to the new care facility in North Dakota. With her husband's passing, Labrensz is staying in her home in Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. Snow falls in downtown Mobridge, South Dakota on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Blowing snow creates hazardous driving conditions during on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019 south of Mobridge, South Dakota. With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view inside the Mobridge Senior Citizens Center on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center has affected nearly every resident in the rural community along the Missouri River. The care facility housed hundreds of residents over several decades, making it difficult to find someone in town that hasn't been tied to the facility at one point or another. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Loretta Leonard, 88, at her home in Mobridge, South Dakota on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. Her husband of nearly 68 years, Dick Leonard, 91, was recently moved about 20 miles from the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center to a nursing home in Selby. In Mobridge, Leonard's husband was only a few blocks away and she would typically arrive in the morning after breakfast and be with her husband until he went to bed. "I go every day when the weather is good," Leonard explains about the daily trips to see her husband in Selby. "I feel like I must be there for him. It's my job to be there." With the winter weather making driving conditions difficult, Leonard could not go visit her husband for nearly a week. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Library Media Specialist Stacy Olson shows kindergarteners at Rita Murphy Elementary School how to draw a circle for an Ozobot activity on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. The Ozobots are small, handheld robots that move and follow a marker line. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Sophomores Kimberly King, left, and Rhiannon Schlegel work in the technology lab at Legacy High School on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Sixth grade students at Wachter Middle School work on charting their digital device activities during a Digital Literacy course on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Principal Kara Four Bears leads sixth graders in a lesson about intellectual property rights and laws in relation to online materials at New Town Middle School on Tuesday, February 26, 2019 in New Town, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 at New Town Middle School on Tuesday, February 26, 2019 in New Town, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Technology Project Lead Aaron Preabt at Legacy High School on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 From left, sixth graders Maryann Hernandez, Fynn Gullicks, Kylie Duchsherer, and Sa'Rai Ridley work on an anti-bulling video at Horizon Middle School on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students play outside at Rita Murphy Elementary School on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 A view of the North Dakota State Capitol building as seen on Bismarck on Thursday, February 28, 2019. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
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 Livestock grazing and agricultural practices can be seen up and down the Powder River area outside of Miles City, Mont., as seen on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2018. Much of the region is dependent on clean ground water for agriculture and healthy livestock. Clean water as a resource can become scarce during drought years, making area residents concerned about safe drilling and mining practices. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Powder River, a tributary of the Yellowstone River, is seen here along a stretch of Custer County in Montana on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2018. The region is predominately covered by livestock grazing and agricultural use with drilling sites and resource extraction scattered throughout. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Livestock grazing and agricultural practices can be seen up and down the Powder River area outside of Miles City, Mont., as seen on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2018. Much of the region is dependent on clean ground water for agriculture and healthy livestock. Clean water as a resource can become scarce during drought years, making area residents concerned about safe drilling and mining practices. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Karen Stevenson's grandparents homesteaded in Montana, and she has lived her entire life in the western state. Maintaining the natural beauty and integrity of the land on her property and public lands across the state is important to landowners like Stevenson who see their role as stewards of a place with a fragile ecosystem and difficult to predict climate. Stevenson, seen here at her property outside of Miles City, Mont., walks through a labyrinth she made from rocks collected on her property. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Robin Smith presents Merle White Tail with his new identification card while working in the enrollment office at Spirit Lake in Fort Totten, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Jenny Ghost Bear, with Four Directions, talks about her motivation to work with the organization to help bring change to her community and to empower to fellow community members. Ghost Bear is seen here at the Four Directions voting headquarters on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018 in Fort Yates, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Phyllis Young, a longtime and well-known and respected community activist, talks about the challenges facing Indigenous voters in the upcoming election, most notably the requirement to prove one's physical address. Young is seen here in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Filmmaker Teena Pugliese, left, works with Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle to film a get out the vote video that will be shared on social media. In her role as Miss Standing Rock, Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle especially encouraged young voters to get to the polls on election day. The women worked out of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe tribal council room in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Enrollment office employee and elder Winona Fox, left, works with Spirit Lake Secretary-Treasurer Lonna Jackson-Street to find a list of how many residents have some to the office in recent days to obtain their physical address in order to vote on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of a tiled mural inside the Spirit Lake Tribe headquarters in Fort Totten, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A harvested corn field is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A wind farm is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train travels north of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. Natural resources help to drive a major portion of the rural West's regional economies. A drill rig can be seen in the background. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kyle Heinrich with Nabors Industry is a drilling rig employee working on a job site outside of Douglas, Wyo. Heinrich is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rancher Jay Butler, like many Wyoming residents, sees the very tangible benefits to the state's communities from natural resource companies extracting minerals and oil from the land. At the same time, Butler also sees the need for continued scrutiny, regulation and responsibility on the part of the companies and Bureau of Land Management. Butler is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A Chesapeake Energy oil site is seen here from a private ranch road north of Douglas, Wyo. on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 In addition to being paid for leasing their land or being paid royalties for their mineral rights, land owners can also be paid for access to drilling sites on their property, making what rancher Jay Butler refers to as some very expensive "toll roads" that the energy companies have no choice but to utilize. The amount of traffic in the energy and resource-rich Wyoming differs greatly from other parts of the rural state. Traffic is seen here from the back seat of Jay Butler's pickup on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Margerite is seen here at her home in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
 The O'Neill Ventures tomato plant is seen here on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 in O'Neill, Nebraska. In August, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested dozens of employees at the tomato greenhouse, sending a wave of change through the small rural community.
 Bryan Corkle, a local school teacher in O'Neill, Nebraska, is pictured here in his classroom at O'Neill High School on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
 A drilling rig works the beginning stages of getting a well site up and running outside of Douglas, Wyo., as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A natural gas flare is seen as on an oil drilling site in a view of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday evening, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Angelica at home with her daughter in O'Neill, Nebraska on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
 A view of the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming High Plains District Office waiting room displays some of Wyoming's natural resources, wildlife and recreational activities for office visitors, as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Senior Stephanie Gonzales, 17, has been living with her best friend's family in recent weeks in an effort to maintain her rigorous school and extracurricular activity schedules. Gonzales' mother is currently being held after having been arrested during the immigration raid that took dozens of community members away from their jobs and their families. Gonzales is seen here at O'Neill High School in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
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 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 The cast takes the stage during a performance of the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Sloane Heersche, 3, left, and sister Aeris Heersche, 5, both of Chicago, get a closer look at the stage during intermission. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kally Wagner, 14, center, Nizhoni Lawton, 11, and Haesha Charette, 12, right, have a snack in the shade while riding horses in Crow Agency, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Cattle at Cody and Deanna Sand�s ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. The Sands practice holistic grazing versus the traditional grazing most of the world�s ranchers follow. The holistic ranching has increased grass production and greatly impacted the Sands� quality of life for the better, including eliminating their financial debt, freeing up time normally spent working, and drastically changed the ecosystem of the land they operate on. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
Cattle at Cody and Deanna Sand�s ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. The Sands practice holistic grazing versus the traditional grazing most of the world�s ranchers follow. The holistic ranching has increased grass production and greatly impacted the Sands� quality of life for the better, including eliminating their financial debt, freeing up time normally spent working, and drastically changed the ecosystem of the land they operate on. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
 Dawn at the Sands� ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
Dawn at the Sands� ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
 Cody Sand and his wife Deanna graze their cattle following holistic ranching practices to work with the native grasslands of North Dakota. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
Cody Sand and his wife Deanna graze their cattle following holistic ranching practices to work with the native grasslands of North Dakota. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
 Dawn at the Sands� ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
Dawn at the Sands� ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
 Cattle at Cody and Deanna Sand�s ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. The Sands practice holistic grazing versus the traditional grazing most of the world�s ranchers follow. The holistic ranching has increased grass production and greatly impacted the Sands� quality of life for the better, including eliminating their financial debt, freeing up time normally spent working, and drastically changed the ecosystem of the land they operate on. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
Cattle at Cody and Deanna Sand�s ranch in Dickey County, North Dakota. The Sands practice holistic grazing versus the traditional grazing most of the world�s ranchers follow. The holistic ranching has increased grass production and greatly impacted the Sands� quality of life for the better, including eliminating their financial debt, freeing up time normally spent working, and drastically changed the ecosystem of the land they operate on. (Photo: Kristina Barker)
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 A view of Henry Red Cloud's property in the Wakpamni District on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, as seen on Friday, March 22, 2019. Red Cloud and his family escaped the flooding at their home which remains just above water but their solar power education businesses is all partially submerged. Red Cloud said this was their ninth day away from their home following a blizzard and subsequent flooding. Henry Red Cloud surveys the damage. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Henry Red Cloud's property in the Wakpamni District on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, as seen on Friday, March 22, 2019. Red Cloud and his family escaped the flooding at their home which remains just above water but their solar power education businesses is all partially submerged. Red Cloud said this was their ninth day away from their home following a blizzard and subsequent flooding. Henry Red Cloud surveys the damage. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Wounded Knee District Secretary Babette Thin Elk has been working tirelessly to answer phones and coordinate supplies and care for area residents stranded by floodwaters. Thin Elk worked out of an office at the Wounded Knee Cap Office on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation on Friday, March 22, 2019. Some of her calls included pleas to help an 84-year-old grandmother and a newborn. Between two homes, there were 8 people needing aid. "We know people are panicked and claustrophobic. We are doing what we can." (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Wounded Knee District Secretary Babette Thin Elk has been working tirelessly to answer phones and coordinate supplies and care for area residents stranded by floodwaters. Thin Elk worked out of an office at the Wounded Knee Cap Office on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation on Friday, March 22, 2019. Some of her calls included pleas to help an 84-year-old grandmother and a newborn. Between two homes, there were 8 people needing aid. "We know people are panicked and claustrophobic. We are doing what we can." (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the flooded highway that connects the villages of Wounded Knee and Manderson on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, as seen on March, 22, 2019. The highway has been closed due to runoff from a recent blizzard causing drainage to run over the road. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the flooded highway that connects the villages of Wounded Knee and Manderson on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, as seen on March, 22, 2019. The highway has been closed due to runoff from a recent blizzard causing drainage to run over the road. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 David Gibbons, left, and Shane Mesteth ride out a rutted out muddy road to the highway to gather food, water and medical supplies to deliver to a nearby resident north of Manderson on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
David Gibbons, left, and Shane Mesteth ride out a rutted out muddy road to the highway to gather food, water and medical supplies to deliver to a nearby resident north of Manderson on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Wounded Knee District Representative Garfield Steele talks about efforts being made in his district to assist residents that have been stranded without food, water or medicine due to flooding on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Steele is seen here at the Wounded Knee Cap Office on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Wounded Knee District Representative Garfield Steele talks about efforts being made in his district to assist residents that have been stranded without food, water or medicine due to flooding on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Steele is seen here at the Wounded Knee Cap Office on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Day laborers and volunteers unload a truck of non-perishable foods from the Food Distribution Program's emergency delivery in Oglala on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Day laborers and volunteers unload a truck of non-perishable foods from the Food Distribution Program's emergency delivery in Oglala on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 David Gibbons, left, and Shane Mesteth ride out a rutted out muddy road to the highway to gather food, water and medical supplies to deliver to a nearby resident north of Manderson on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
David Gibbons, left, and Shane Mesteth ride out a rutted out muddy road to the highway to gather food, water and medical supplies to deliver to a nearby resident north of Manderson on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota on Friday, March 22, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Blowing snow creates hazardous driving conditions during on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019 south of Mobridge, South Dakota. With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Blowing snow creates hazardous driving conditions during on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019 south of Mobridge, South Dakota. With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Horses shield themselves from the blowing snow in Mobridge, South Dakota on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center prompted the move of about 5 dozen residents to area facilities across western South Dakota. Hazardous driving conditions has made winter travel difficult for community residents to be able to leave town and visit loved ones in other facilities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Horses shield themselves from the blowing snow in Mobridge, South Dakota on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center prompted the move of about 5 dozen residents to area facilities across western South Dakota. Hazardous driving conditions has made winter travel difficult for community residents to be able to leave town and visit loved ones in other facilities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The Mo-Rest Motel in Mobridge, South Dakota is seen here on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. The rural South Dakota town along the Missouri River is a hub for regional residents. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center prompted the move of about 5 dozen residents to area facilities across western South Dakota. Hazardous driving conditions has made winter travel difficult for community residents to be able to leave town and visit loved ones in other facilities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The Mo-Rest Motel in Mobridge, South Dakota is seen here on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. The rural South Dakota town along the Missouri River is a hub for regional residents. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center prompted the move of about 5 dozen residents to area facilities across western South Dakota. Hazardous driving conditions has made winter travel difficult for community residents to be able to leave town and visit loved ones in other facilities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Peg Waddell, 78, left, Catherine Spiry, 75, second from left, Betty Swanson, 80, and Don Waddell, 78, play a game of pinochle at the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. While playing cards, everyone in the group explained how many family members and friends they have had in the care facility throughout the decades of operation in the community. "I hope they have one when I need it," Betty Swanson said about the lack of services for aging residents needing specialized care in Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Peg Waddell, 78, left, Catherine Spiry, 75, second from left, Betty Swanson, 80, and Don Waddell, 78, play a game of pinochle at the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. While playing cards, everyone in the group explained how many family members and friends they have had in the care facility throughout the decades of operation in the community. "I hope they have one when I need it," Betty Swanson said about the lack of services for aging residents needing specialized care in Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view inside the Mobridge Senior Citizens Center on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center has affected nearly every resident in the rural community along the Missouri River. The care facility housed hundreds of residents over several decades, making it difficult to find someone in town that hasn't been tied to the facility at one point or another. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view inside the Mobridge Senior Citizens Center on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center has affected nearly every resident in the rural community along the Missouri River. The care facility housed hundreds of residents over several decades, making it difficult to find someone in town that hasn't been tied to the facility at one point or another. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Blowing snow creates hazardous driving conditions during on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019 south of Mobridge, South Dakota. With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Blowing snow creates hazardous driving conditions during on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019 south of Mobridge, South Dakota. With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Barb Opie, 76, husband Don Opie was recently moved from the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center to over 2 hours away at a nursing in Redfield, South Dakota. Because of the far distance, Opie is only able to travel to see her husband every other weekend. When her husband was at the nursing home in Mobridge, Opie would see her husband every day after she got done at work. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Barb Opie, 76, husband Don Opie was recently moved from the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center to over 2 hours away at a nursing in Redfield, South Dakota. Because of the far distance, Opie is only able to travel to see her husband every other weekend. When her husband was at the nursing home in Mobridge, Opie would see her husband every day after she got done at work. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Ramona Labrensz, 87, is seen here with a photo of her late husband Harold at her home in Mobridge, South Dakota on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. Labrensz's husband Harold recently passed away just a few days after being moved from the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center to a nursing facility in New Rockford, North Dakota. With her local facility closing and he husband about to be nearly 4 hours away, Labrensz had rented an efficiency apartment close to the new care facility in North Dakota. With her husband's passing, Labrensz is staying in her home in Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Ramona Labrensz, 87, is seen here with a photo of her late husband Harold at her home in Mobridge, South Dakota on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. Labrensz's husband Harold recently passed away just a few days after being moved from the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center to a nursing facility in New Rockford, North Dakota. With her local facility closing and he husband about to be nearly 4 hours away, Labrensz had rented an efficiency apartment close to the new care facility in North Dakota. With her husband's passing, Labrensz is staying in her home in Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. Snow falls in downtown Mobridge, South Dakota on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. Snow falls in downtown Mobridge, South Dakota on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Blowing snow creates hazardous driving conditions during on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019 south of Mobridge, South Dakota. With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Blowing snow creates hazardous driving conditions during on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019 south of Mobridge, South Dakota. With the recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center, many area residents are now having to travel as far as 4 hours to see loved ones in nursing homes throughout the region. Winter weather can make for hazardous driving conditions in the rural town along the Missouri River, making travel impossible for some residents needing to visit loved ones outside Mobridge. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view inside the Mobridge Senior Citizens Center on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center has affected nearly every resident in the rural community along the Missouri River. The care facility housed hundreds of residents over several decades, making it difficult to find someone in town that hasn't been tied to the facility at one point or another. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view inside the Mobridge Senior Citizens Center on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019. The recent closure of the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center has affected nearly every resident in the rural community along the Missouri River. The care facility housed hundreds of residents over several decades, making it difficult to find someone in town that hasn't been tied to the facility at one point or another. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Loretta Leonard, 88, at her home in Mobridge, South Dakota on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. Her husband of nearly 68 years, Dick Leonard, 91, was recently moved about 20 miles from the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center to a nursing home in Selby. In Mobridge, Leonard's husband was only a few blocks away and she would typically arrive in the morning after breakfast and be with her husband until he went to bed. "I go every day when the weather is good," Leonard explains about the daily trips to see her husband in Selby. "I feel like I must be there for him. It's my job to be there." With the winter weather making driving conditions difficult, Leonard could not go visit her husband for nearly a week. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Loretta Leonard, 88, at her home in Mobridge, South Dakota on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019. Her husband of nearly 68 years, Dick Leonard, 91, was recently moved about 20 miles from the Mobridge Care and Rehabilitation Center to a nursing home in Selby. In Mobridge, Leonard's husband was only a few blocks away and she would typically arrive in the morning after breakfast and be with her husband until he went to bed. "I go every day when the weather is good," Leonard explains about the daily trips to see her husband in Selby. "I feel like I must be there for him. It's my job to be there." With the winter weather making driving conditions difficult, Leonard could not go visit her husband for nearly a week. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Library Media Specialist Stacy Olson shows kindergarteners at Rita Murphy Elementary School how to draw a circle for an Ozobot activity on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. The Ozobots are small, handheld robots that move and follow a marker line. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Library Media Specialist Stacy Olson shows kindergarteners at Rita Murphy Elementary School how to draw a circle for an Ozobot activity on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. The Ozobots are small, handheld robots that move and follow a marker line. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Sophomores Kimberly King, left, and Rhiannon Schlegel work in the technology lab at Legacy High School on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Sophomores Kimberly King, left, and Rhiannon Schlegel work in the technology lab at Legacy High School on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Sixth grade students at Wachter Middle School work on charting their digital device activities during a Digital Literacy course on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Sixth grade students at Wachter Middle School work on charting their digital device activities during a Digital Literacy course on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Principal Kara Four Bears leads sixth graders in a lesson about intellectual property rights and laws in relation to online materials at New Town Middle School on Tuesday, February 26, 2019 in New Town, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Principal Kara Four Bears leads sixth graders in a lesson about intellectual property rights and laws in relation to online materials at New Town Middle School on Tuesday, February 26, 2019 in New Town, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 at New Town Middle School on Tuesday, February 26, 2019 in New Town, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
at New Town Middle School on Tuesday, February 26, 2019 in New Town, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Technology Project Lead Aaron Preabt at Legacy High School on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Technology Project Lead Aaron Preabt at Legacy High School on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 From left, sixth graders Maryann Hernandez, Fynn Gullicks, Kylie Duchsherer, and Sa'Rai Ridley work on an anti-bulling video at Horizon Middle School on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
From left, sixth graders Maryann Hernandez, Fynn Gullicks, Kylie Duchsherer, and Sa'Rai Ridley work on an anti-bulling video at Horizon Middle School on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 Students play outside at Rita Murphy Elementary School on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
Students play outside at Rita Murphy Elementary School on Thursday, February 28, 2019 in Bismarck, North Dakota. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
 A view of the North Dakota State Capitol building as seen on Bismarck on Thursday, February 28, 2019. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
A view of the North Dakota State Capitol building as seen on Bismarck on Thursday, February 28, 2019. (Kristina Barker for Education Week)
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 Livestock grazing and agricultural practices can be seen up and down the Powder River area outside of Miles City, Mont., as seen on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2018. Much of the region is dependent on clean ground water for agriculture and healthy livestock. Clean water as a resource can become scarce during drought years, making area residents concerned about safe drilling and mining practices. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Livestock grazing and agricultural practices can be seen up and down the Powder River area outside of Miles City, Mont., as seen on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2018. Much of the region is dependent on clean ground water for agriculture and healthy livestock. Clean water as a resource can become scarce during drought years, making area residents concerned about safe drilling and mining practices. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Powder River, a tributary of the Yellowstone River, is seen here along a stretch of Custer County in Montana on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2018. The region is predominately covered by livestock grazing and agricultural use with drilling sites and resource extraction scattered throughout. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Powder River, a tributary of the Yellowstone River, is seen here along a stretch of Custer County in Montana on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2018. The region is predominately covered by livestock grazing and agricultural use with drilling sites and resource extraction scattered throughout. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Livestock grazing and agricultural practices can be seen up and down the Powder River area outside of Miles City, Mont., as seen on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2018. Much of the region is dependent on clean ground water for agriculture and healthy livestock. Clean water as a resource can become scarce during drought years, making area residents concerned about safe drilling and mining practices. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Livestock grazing and agricultural practices can be seen up and down the Powder River area outside of Miles City, Mont., as seen on Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2018. Much of the region is dependent on clean ground water for agriculture and healthy livestock. Clean water as a resource can become scarce during drought years, making area residents concerned about safe drilling and mining practices. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Karen Stevenson's grandparents homesteaded in Montana, and she has lived her entire life in the western state. Maintaining the natural beauty and integrity of the land on her property and public lands across the state is important to landowners like Stevenson who see their role as stewards of a place with a fragile ecosystem and difficult to predict climate. Stevenson, seen here at her property outside of Miles City, Mont., walks through a labyrinth she made from rocks collected on her property. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Karen Stevenson's grandparents homesteaded in Montana, and she has lived her entire life in the western state. Maintaining the natural beauty and integrity of the land on her property and public lands across the state is important to landowners like Stevenson who see their role as stewards of a place with a fragile ecosystem and difficult to predict climate. Stevenson, seen here at her property outside of Miles City, Mont., walks through a labyrinth she made from rocks collected on her property. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Robin Smith presents Merle White Tail with his new identification card while working in the enrollment office at Spirit Lake in Fort Totten, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Robin Smith presents Merle White Tail with his new identification card while working in the enrollment office at Spirit Lake in Fort Totten, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Jenny Ghost Bear, with Four Directions, talks about her motivation to work with the organization to help bring change to her community and to empower to fellow community members. Ghost Bear is seen here at the Four Directions voting headquarters on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018 in Fort Yates, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Jenny Ghost Bear, with Four Directions, talks about her motivation to work with the organization to help bring change to her community and to empower to fellow community members. Ghost Bear is seen here at the Four Directions voting headquarters on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018 in Fort Yates, North Dakota. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Phyllis Young, a longtime and well-known and respected community activist, talks about the challenges facing Indigenous voters in the upcoming election, most notably the requirement to prove one's physical address. Young is seen here in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Phyllis Young, a longtime and well-known and respected community activist, talks about the challenges facing Indigenous voters in the upcoming election, most notably the requirement to prove one's physical address. Young is seen here in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Filmmaker Teena Pugliese, left, works with Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle to film a get out the vote video that will be shared on social media. In her role as Miss Standing Rock, Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle especially encouraged young voters to get to the polls on election day. The women worked out of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe tribal council room in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Filmmaker Teena Pugliese, left, works with Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle to film a get out the vote video that will be shared on social media. In her role as Miss Standing Rock, Wanbli Waunsila Win Eagle especially encouraged young voters to get to the polls on election day. The women worked out of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe tribal council room in Fort Yates, North Dakota on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Enrollment office employee and elder Winona Fox, left, works with Spirit Lake Secretary-Treasurer Lonna Jackson-Street to find a list of how many residents have some to the office in recent days to obtain their physical address in order to vote on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Enrollment office employee and elder Winona Fox, left, works with Spirit Lake Secretary-Treasurer Lonna Jackson-Street to find a list of how many residents have some to the office in recent days to obtain their physical address in order to vote on election day. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of a tiled mural inside the Spirit Lake Tribe headquarters in Fort Totten, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of a tiled mural inside the Spirit Lake Tribe headquarters in Fort Totten, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Hensler, North Dakota as seen on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A harvested corn field is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A harvested corn field is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A wind farm is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A wind farm is seen in rural Pierce County, North Dakota on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Energy and agriculture are issues on the minds of many voters in the state. In a state dominated by Republican politics and a lack of Indigenous representation in politics, community leaders are hoping for a record-number of Indigenous voters to bring change to issues surrounding education, healthcare, missing and murdered Indigenous women and children, human trafficking, energy, environment, and representation of all of North Dakota's communities and citizens at a state level. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train travels north of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. Natural resources help to drive a major portion of the rural West's regional economies. A drill rig can be seen in the background. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A coal train travels north of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. Natural resources help to drive a major portion of the rural West's regional economies. A drill rig can be seen in the background. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kyle Heinrich with Nabors Industry is a drilling rig employee working on a job site outside of Douglas, Wyo. Heinrich is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Kyle Heinrich with Nabors Industry is a drilling rig employee working on a job site outside of Douglas, Wyo. Heinrich is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rancher Jay Butler, like many Wyoming residents, sees the very tangible benefits to the state's communities from natural resource companies extracting minerals and oil from the land. At the same time, Butler also sees the need for continued scrutiny, regulation and responsibility on the part of the companies and Bureau of Land Management. Butler is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Rancher Jay Butler, like many Wyoming residents, sees the very tangible benefits to the state's communities from natural resource companies extracting minerals and oil from the land. At the same time, Butler also sees the need for continued scrutiny, regulation and responsibility on the part of the companies and Bureau of Land Management. Butler is seen here on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A Chesapeake Energy oil site is seen here from a private ranch road north of Douglas, Wyo. on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A Chesapeake Energy oil site is seen here from a private ranch road north of Douglas, Wyo. on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 In addition to being paid for leasing their land or being paid royalties for their mineral rights, land owners can also be paid for access to drilling sites on their property, making what rancher Jay Butler refers to as some very expensive "toll roads" that the energy companies have no choice but to utilize. The amount of traffic in the energy and resource-rich Wyoming differs greatly from other parts of the rural state. Traffic is seen here from the back seat of Jay Butler's pickup on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
In addition to being paid for leasing their land or being paid royalties for their mineral rights, land owners can also be paid for access to drilling sites on their property, making what rancher Jay Butler refers to as some very expensive "toll roads" that the energy companies have no choice but to utilize. The amount of traffic in the energy and resource-rich Wyoming differs greatly from other parts of the rural state. Traffic is seen here from the back seat of Jay Butler's pickup on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Kristen Kilmer
Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer with her 12-year-old daughter Cadence Kilmer at the family's home in Spearfish, South Dakota on Tuesday evening, Oct. 2, 2018.
Kristen Kilmer
Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer at her family's home in Spearfish, South Dakota on Tuesday evening, Oct. 2, 2018.
Kristen Kilmer
Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer spreads out her daily medications, including Lynparza, center, which costs nearly $17,000 per month.
Kristen Kilmer
Kristen KilmerKristen Kilmer with her 12-year-old daughter Cadence Kilmer at the family's home in Spearfish, South Dakota on Tuesday evening, Oct. 2, 2018.
 Margerite is seen here at her home in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
Margerite is seen here at her home in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
 The O'Neill Ventures tomato plant is seen here on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 in O'Neill, Nebraska. In August, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested dozens of employees at the tomato greenhouse, sending a wave of change through the small rural community.
The O'Neill Ventures tomato plant is seen here on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 in O'Neill, Nebraska. In August, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested dozens of employees at the tomato greenhouse, sending a wave of change through the small rural community.
 Bryan Corkle, a local school teacher in O'Neill, Nebraska, is pictured here in his classroom at O'Neill High School on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
Bryan Corkle, a local school teacher in O'Neill, Nebraska, is pictured here in his classroom at O'Neill High School on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
 A drilling rig works the beginning stages of getting a well site up and running outside of Douglas, Wyo., as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A drilling rig works the beginning stages of getting a well site up and running outside of Douglas, Wyo., as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A natural gas flare is seen as on an oil drilling site in a view of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday evening, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A natural gas flare is seen as on an oil drilling site in a view of Douglas, Wyo. as seen on Wednesday evening, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Angelica at home with her daughter in O'Neill, Nebraska on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
Angelica at home with her daughter in O'Neill, Nebraska on Sunday, Oct. 14, 2018.
 A view of the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming High Plains District Office waiting room displays some of Wyoming's natural resources, wildlife and recreational activities for office visitors, as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming High Plains District Office waiting room displays some of Wyoming's natural resources, wildlife and recreational activities for office visitors, as seen on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Senior Stephanie Gonzales, 17, has been living with her best friend's family in recent weeks in an effort to maintain her rigorous school and extracurricular activity schedules. Gonzales' mother is currently being held after having been arrested during the immigration raid that took dozens of community members away from their jobs and their families. Gonzales is seen here at O'Neill High School in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
Senior Stephanie Gonzales, 17, has been living with her best friend's family in recent weeks in an effort to maintain her rigorous school and extracurricular activity schedules. Gonzales' mother is currently being held after having been arrested during the immigration raid that took dozens of community members away from their jobs and their families. Gonzales is seen here at O'Neill High School in O'Neill, Nebraska on Monday, Oct. 15, 2018.
MERRILLFARMS
MERRILLFARMSChores around the farm vary from day to day, but on this particular day one of Bob's chores included moving the large irrigation sprinkler in the alfalfa field so it would be out of the way for cutting in the coming days. The sprinkler movement is controlled by a large motor. Bob is seen here at the field outside of Parker, South Dakota on May 23, 2018.
MERRILLFARMS
MERRILLFARMSDairy cattle are seen on the Merrill family farm in Parker, South Dakota on Wednesday, May 23, 2018.
MERRILLFARMS
MERRILLFARMSBob Merrill's father began farming in Parker, South Dakota in 1968. Bob's grandson Shane Merrill joined the family operation in 2011. Bob poses with his 1960s tractor at the family's farm on Wednesday, May 23, 2018.
MERRILLFARMS
MERRILLFARMSFrom left to right, Allen Merrill, Shane Merrill and Bob Merrill represent three of the four generations of farmers that have operated the family's farm and dairy business in Parker, South Dakota, as seen here on May 23, 2018.
MERRILLFARMS
MERRILLFARMSShane Merrill walks to his tractor to disc a field in preparation for planting while working on the family farm outside Parker, South Dakota on May 23, 2018. Discing is a process that tills the soil before seeds will be planted. Remnants of last year's corn crop are still visible in the field.
MERRILLFARMS
MERRILLFARMSA barn on the southeast edge of town in Parker, South Dakota, as seen on Wednesday, May 23, 2018.
MERRILLFARMS
MERRILLFARMSA view of Main Avenue in downtown Parker, South Dakota, as seen on Wednesday, May 23, 2018.
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 Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Burning Hills Singer Candice Lively Wollan behind the theatre before the evening's Medora Musical performance. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 The cast takes the stage during a performance of the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
The cast takes the stage during a performance of the Medora Musical. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Sloane Heersche, 3, left, and sister Aeris Heersche, 5, both of Chicago, get a closer look at the stage during intermission. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Sloane Heersche, 3, left, and sister Aeris Heersche, 5, both of Chicago, get a closer look at the stage during intermission. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Kally Wagner, 14, center, Nizhoni Lawton, 11, and Haesha Charette, 12, right, have a snack in the shade while riding horses in Crow Agency, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Kally Wagner, 14, center, Nizhoni Lawton, 11, and Haesha Charette, 12, right, have a snack in the shade while riding horses in Crow Agency, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Theo Hugs, left, and her daughter Jill Hugs-Hill at Hugs's shop, River Crow Trading Post, in Crow Agency, Montana. Mrs. Hugs-Hills will eventually assume ownership of the shop that is currently owned by her mother. Mrs. Hugs-Hill's husband works at the Westmoreland coal mine in Hardin, Montana and explains that jobs provided by the coal industry are vital to many families in the area. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of the Decker Coal Mine, as seen across the Tongue River Reservoir near Decker, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Cattle graze along Big Goose Creek, one of the many waterways snaking through the region, outside of Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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