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 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Ray Worden, a service technician with Grossenburg Implement dealership in Winner, South Dakota, drives to a service call near Colome, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. Worden may travel as far as 200 miles and across state lines to Nebraska to complete service calls. He can often spend the majority of his day driving to and from service calls and the dealership shop in Winner, South Dakota. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Ray Worden, a service technician with Grossenburg Implement dealership in Winner, South Dakota, leaves a service call near Colome, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. Worden may travel as far as 200 miles and across state lines to Nebraska to complete service calls. He can often spend the majority of his day driving to and from service calls and the dealership shop in Winner, South Dakota. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in southwestern South Dakota is isolated from the surrounding non-reservation communities. Rapid City, the largest city where many area residents do the majority of essential shopping, is 100 miles from the village of Pine Ridge. Few grocery stores exist on the reservation, with one or no stores in some villages of the nearly 3,500 square mile reservation. Several days each month, the Oglala Sioux Tribe Food Distribution Commodity Warehouse will set up a remote food bank in villages like Kyle and Wanblee so residents don't have to travel as far as the village of Pine Ridge for food. (Kristina Barker)
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
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 In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, livestock are kept in a holding area at the tribe's corrals. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe in south-central South Dakota relies heavily on the business generated from the tribal ranch. Tribal members fear that damage to the land or water resources due to a malfunction on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline could ruin the agricultural success the reservation currently sees.
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 In this June 13, 2015 photo, lights from the oil fields light up the sky over the Little Missouri River State Park.
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 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
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 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
 The historic Fairmont Creamery building at Main and 2nd streets was one of the first spaces east of Fifth to have been renovated for house multiple new businesses.
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
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 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
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 Julie Trask's cousin Mick Trask helps her get control of stud horses in preparation for castrating. The horses are given a medication to help calm them before they are given a medication to sedate them for the quick field surgery.
 Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
 Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
 Jenn works with one of her horses at the indoor arena at her home in Armstrong County.
 A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
 Jenn Zeller crosses the Missouri River back to the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation.
 Jenn Zeller and her partner Zach Ducheneaux catch up at the end of their day at their home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation.
 Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
 Jenn and other neighbors, family and friends get ready for the day's branding.
 Train cars move through a loading area at Peabody Energy's Rawhide Mine, as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. Peabody Energy filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of a residential neighborhood as seen from Boxelder Road in Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have meant hundreds of layoffs and a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Roger Rettig plays the pedal steel guitar in the Medora Musical, a musical and variety show held every summer in Medora, N.D. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 A view along South Dakota Highway 71 outside Hot Springs. Rural water needs include not only tap water but agriculture and fire suppression. The Southern Black Hills Water System in southwestern South Dakota delivers water to area residents across Fall River and Custer counties. With about 120 miles of pipeline in the water system, the terrain of rolling prairie, with it's rugged rocky slopes, paired with the cascading cliffs and high outcroppings of the Black Hills has made development challenging and costly. Now in its thirteenth year, the water system serves nearly 400 taps.
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 Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. A view from the top of the elevator shows downtown Rapid City and a city park, as seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. The property is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of Ekalaka's Main Street on Sunday morning. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Julie Trask semen tests bulls at client Marvin Willaims' ranch near Owanka. The process begins with Trask and Williams moving bulls into a holding chute where Trask then inserts an electric probe into the bull's rear. When the electric probe is turned on, the electric pulses cause the bull to become erect, making it possible for Trask to get a semen sample. The sample, along with measurements of the bull's scrotum and observations about their hooves tells Trask the strength and virility of each bull. That information will then be used by Williams for his own cattle operation's breeding purses or when he goes to sell the bulls.
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 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The moon sets over south central South Dakota at sunrise along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The sun rises over south central South Dakota along U.S. Highway 183 north of Winner, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Ray Worden, a service technician with Grossenburg Implement dealership in Winner, South Dakota, drives to a service call near Colome, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. Worden may travel as far as 200 miles and across state lines to Nebraska to complete service calls. He can often spend the majority of his day driving to and from service calls and the dealership shop in Winner, South Dakota. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Ray Worden, a service technician with Grossenburg Implement dealership in Winner, South Dakota, drives to a service call near Colome, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. Worden may travel as far as 200 miles and across state lines to Nebraska to complete service calls. He can often spend the majority of his day driving to and from service calls and the dealership shop in Winner, South Dakota. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Ray Worden, a service technician with Grossenburg Implement dealership in Winner, South Dakota, leaves a service call near Colome, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. Worden may travel as far as 200 miles and across state lines to Nebraska to complete service calls. He can often spend the majority of his day driving to and from service calls and the dealership shop in Winner, South Dakota. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Ray Worden, a service technician with Grossenburg Implement dealership in Winner, South Dakota, leaves a service call near Colome, South Dakota on Friday, Nov. 7, 2014. Worden may travel as far as 200 miles and across state lines to Nebraska to complete service calls. He can often spend the majority of his day driving to and from service calls and the dealership shop in Winner, South Dakota. The drop in oil prices can greatly affect the area's ranchers and farmers who rely heavily on large equipment to get daily work done like feeding and moving livestock or harvesting and planting grains. The drop in oil prices is also beneficial to the companies providing service to these agricultural workers as businesses are spread out across the state with many miles between locations or services offered. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in southwestern South Dakota is isolated from the surrounding non-reservation communities. Rapid City, the largest city where many area residents do the majority of essential shopping, is 100 miles from the village of Pine Ridge. Few grocery stores exist on the reservation, with one or no stores in some villages of the nearly 3,500 square mile reservation. Several days each month, the Oglala Sioux Tribe Food Distribution Commodity Warehouse will set up a remote food bank in villages like Kyle and Wanblee so residents don't have to travel as far as the village of Pine Ridge for food. (Kristina Barker)
The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in southwestern South Dakota is isolated from the surrounding non-reservation communities. Rapid City, the largest city where many area residents do the majority of essential shopping, is 100 miles from the village of Pine Ridge. Few grocery stores exist on the reservation, with one or no stores in some villages of the nearly 3,500 square mile reservation. Several days each month, the Oglala Sioux Tribe Food Distribution Commodity Warehouse will set up a remote food bank in villages like Kyle and Wanblee so residents don't have to travel as far as the village of Pine Ridge for food. (Kristina Barker)
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
 In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. 

Kristina Barker for The New York Times
In this Tuesday, April 22, 2015 photo, the last light of the day settles on the Badlands as seen from the Red Shirt Table Overlook on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The communities on Pine Ridge have seen a rash of suicides where predominantly teenagers and young adults have taken their lives. Community members blame a variety of factors including socioeconomic situations, cyber bullying and a loss of hope for their future. Kristina Barker for The New York Times
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 In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, livestock are kept in a holding area at the tribe's corrals. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe in south-central South Dakota relies heavily on the business generated from the tribal ranch. Tribal members fear that damage to the land or water resources due to a malfunction on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline could ruin the agricultural success the reservation currently sees.
In this Sunday, April 26, 2015 photo, livestock are kept in a holding area at the tribe's corrals. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe in south-central South Dakota relies heavily on the business generated from the tribal ranch. Tribal members fear that damage to the land or water resources due to a malfunction on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline could ruin the agricultural success the reservation currently sees.
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 In this June 13, 2015 photo, lights from the oil fields light up the sky over the Little Missouri River State Park.
In this June 13, 2015 photo, lights from the oil fields light up the sky over the Little Missouri River State Park.
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 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
WYG - SD
WYG - SDA four-bedroom home in Keystone, South Dakota is on the market for $795,000. The home was built within a portion of a 1920s wood mill. The nearly 17-acre property also includes several outbuildings. The home features a master bedroom, two guest rooms and one full bathroom which is only accessible from outside the home. Several outbuildings are still standing on the historic property. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
Rapid City's downtown blocks east of Fifth Street have long been an area for blue collar jobs such as printing and commercial laundry services. The neighborhood is now becoming more of a mix of new businesses housed in the historic buildings.
 The historic Fairmont Creamery building at Main and 2nd streets was one of the first spaces east of Fifth to have been renovated for house multiple new businesses.
The historic Fairmont Creamery building at Main and 2nd streets was one of the first spaces east of Fifth to have been renovated for house multiple new businesses.
 The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
The transformation of a downtown parking lot at Main and 6th streets in Rapid City into a public space has helped to transform the city. Main Street Square is a huge draw for pedestrians to be filling the streets, stores and public spaces throughout downtown.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
Lindsey Hays and Andrew Hays have lived in Rosebud since July 2014. The couple was drawn to the area after Andrew spent time in South Dakota while he working as an instructor with Teach for America. Now a manager of teacher leadership development working with elementary school teachers, Andrew has returned to Rosebud with his wife who works as a clinical dietician at the Rosebud Comprehensive Healthcare Facility. They say a big part about what they love about the area is that although it is rural, they love the scenic beauty.
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
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 Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
Jill O'Brien and Dan O'Brien own Wild Idea Buffalo based in Rapid City, South Dakota. Their ranch land covers about 22,000 acres of the Great Plains along the Cheyenne River and Badlands areas of the state. Their buffalo heard is 100-percent grass fed and are field harvested rather than feed lot finished and harvested at a processing facility. The O'Briens believe that the Great Plains ecosystem needs buffalo to thrive. Dan O'Brien explains that buffalo are less damaging to the land, healthier for people to consume, and are a superior product compared to beef. The couple carries great pride in their buffalo operation, keeping true to their sense of stewardship by not subjecting their heard to what Jill O'Brien describes as "cruel and unusual punishment" of feed lots. Dan O'Brien says that their grass-fed operation is also unique in that it does not encourage further production of corn-fed proteins and conversion of Great Plains farmland to "monocultures" of GMO farming. The couple lives and ranches about 30 miles east of Rapid City.
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 Julie Trask's cousin Mick Trask helps her get control of stud horses in preparation for castrating. The horses are given a medication to help calm them before they are given a medication to sedate them for the quick field surgery.
Julie Trask's cousin Mick Trask helps her get control of stud horses in preparation for castrating. The horses are given a medication to help calm them before they are given a medication to sedate them for the quick field surgery.
 Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
Tom Trask has lived in Elm Springs his entire life. He ranches along Elk Creek with his son Mick and is a strong advocate for the rights of ranchers and farmers.
 Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
Jenn Zeller feeds mares in a pasture at her home in Armstrong County. The mares are favorites among fans of her photography.
 Jenn works with one of her horses at the indoor arena at her home in Armstrong County.
Jenn works with one of her horses at the indoor arena at her home in Armstrong County.
 A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
A view of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation from the east bank of the Missouri River.
 Jenn Zeller crosses the Missouri River back to the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation.
Jenn Zeller crosses the Missouri River back to the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation.
 Jenn Zeller and her partner Zach Ducheneaux catch up at the end of their day at their home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation.
Jenn Zeller and her partner Zach Ducheneaux catch up at the end of their day at their home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation.
 Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
Jenn Zeller drives back from dinner to her home on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation
 Jenn and other neighbors, family and friends get ready for the day's branding.
Jenn and other neighbors, family and friends get ready for the day's branding.
 Train cars move through a loading area at Peabody Energy's Rawhide Mine, as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. Peabody Energy filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Train cars move through a loading area at Peabody Energy's Rawhide Mine, as seen outside Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have translated into hundreds of layoffs and have a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. Peabody Energy filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in April. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of a residential neighborhood as seen from Boxelder Road in Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have meant hundreds of layoffs and a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of a residential neighborhood as seen from Boxelder Road in Gillette, Wyoming, Friday, June 10, 2016. Bankruptcy filings made by coal mines in the Gillette area have meant hundreds of layoffs and a rippling effect through the region's economy and communities. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
A view of Parmalee, South Dakota on the Rosebud Indian Reservation at dusk.
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view from the reservation side of the road into the views of Badlands National Park as seen on Wednesday, April 5, 2017, along Cuny Table Road on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Without national funding like that from the National Endowment for the Arts, art and cultural programs in sparsely populated rural states like South Dakota are at risk of disappearing altogether. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Cattle at Art Hayes' ranch. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes in one of his family's alfalfa fields, just a portion of the land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Art Hayes, pictured here along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, on his ranch that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Art Hayes' land along the Tongue River near Birney, Montana, that has been a part of his family since his great grandfather settled on the Three Circle ranch in 1886. "I love that peace and quiet," Mr. Hayes explains about his love for being a steward of the land. "It's my little piece of heaven and I'm going to fight for it. "Even my great grandfather said, 'You're not going to make it without irrigation,'" he recalls his father saying. "It's just vital to us. We're here for the long run. It's (the land) is very productive. But it takes water." Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of irrigated fields along the Tongue River south of Birney, Montana. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A coal train moves through Sheridan, Wyoming. Residents in Montana's coal country debate the benefits natural resource extraction brings to the region with the damaging effects of water contamination. While the high-paying jobs brings much-needed prosperity to some of the area's communities, the presence of coal mining some argue threatens the livelihood of those who depend on clean water for agriculture. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 Roger Rettig plays the pedal steel guitar in the Medora Musical, a musical and variety show held every summer in Medora, N.D. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
Roger Rettig plays the pedal steel guitar in the Medora Musical, a musical and variety show held every summer in Medora, N.D. Set against the natural backdrop of the rural North Dakota badlands, the Medora Musical offers audience members a unique outdoor theatre experience. The amphitheatre was built in 1958 and has been host to the Medora Musical since 1965. (Kristina Barker for the The New York Times)
 A view along South Dakota Highway 71 outside Hot Springs. Rural water needs include not only tap water but agriculture and fire suppression. The Southern Black Hills Water System in southwestern South Dakota delivers water to area residents across Fall River and Custer counties. With about 120 miles of pipeline in the water system, the terrain of rolling prairie, with it's rugged rocky slopes, paired with the cascading cliffs and high outcroppings of the Black Hills has made development challenging and costly. Now in its thirteenth year, the water system serves nearly 400 taps.
A view along South Dakota Highway 71 outside Hot Springs. Rural water needs include not only tap water but agriculture and fire suppression. The Southern Black Hills Water System in southwestern South Dakota delivers water to area residents across Fall River and Custer counties. With about 120 miles of pipeline in the water system, the terrain of rolling prairie, with it's rugged rocky slopes, paired with the cascading cliffs and high outcroppings of the Black Hills has made development challenging and costly. Now in its thirteenth year, the water system serves nearly 400 taps.
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 Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
Tom Lien, president of Dakota Mill & Gran, Inc. is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018 at the Rapid City, South Dakota grain elevator. The grain elevator is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City and ships grain by rail throughout the country to processing facilities. The facility processes grain such as corn, wheat, safflower, and oat. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. A view from the top of the elevator shows downtown Rapid City and a city park, as seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. A view from the top of the elevator shows downtown Rapid City and a city park, as seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. The property is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
The grain elevator at Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is one of the tallest structures in the downtown skyline of Rapid City, South Dakota. The property is seen here on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
 A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Dakota Mill & Grain Inc. is seen from downtown Rapid City, South Dakota on Friday, March 2, 2018. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 A view of Ekalaka's Main Street on Sunday morning. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
A view of Ekalaka's Main Street on Sunday morning. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams campaigned in Ekalaka, Montana on Sunday, April 8, 2018. The meet and greet was held at the Wagon Wheel Cafe in the rural eastern Montana town that is home to less than 400 residents. While a snowstorm hindered travel for several area supporters who called the cafe to say they had gotten stuck on the road, several area residents did attend the event. Topics of discussion included healthcare, environmental concerns, agriculture and challenges facing ranchers, emigration or rural brain drain, access to public services and concerns that census reports do not accurately capture a picture of rural areas. Congressional candidate Kathleen Williams hopes to secure the Democratic nomination during the upcoming June 5 primary in Montana in an effort to unseat the Republican incumbent in November. (Kristina Barker for The New York Times)
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 Julie Trask semen tests bulls at client Marvin Willaims' ranch near Owanka. The process begins with Trask and Williams moving bulls into a holding chute where Trask then inserts an electric probe into the bull's rear. When the electric probe is turned on, the electric pulses cause the bull to become erect, making it possible for Trask to get a semen sample. The sample, along with measurements of the bull's scrotum and observations about their hooves tells Trask the strength and virility of each bull. That information will then be used by Williams for his own cattle operation's breeding purses or when he goes to sell the bulls.
Julie Trask semen tests bulls at client Marvin Willaims' ranch near Owanka. The process begins with Trask and Williams moving bulls into a holding chute where Trask then inserts an electric probe into the bull's rear. When the electric probe is turned on, the electric pulses cause the bull to become erect, making it possible for Trask to get a semen sample. The sample, along with measurements of the bull's scrotum and observations about their hooves tells Trask the strength and virility of each bull. That information will then be used by Williams for his own cattle operation's breeding purses or when he goes to sell the bulls.
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